Do socioeconomic disparities affect accessing and keeping antihypertensive drug therapy? Evidence from an Italian population-based study

G. Corrao, A. Zambon, A. Parodi, M. Mezzanzanica, L. Merlino, G. Cesana, G. Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted this population-based cohort study by linking several databases to explore the role of socioeconomic position for accessing and keeping antihypertensive drug therapy. A total of 71469 patients, residents in the city of Milan (Italy) aged 40-80 years, who received an antihypertensive drug during 1999-2002 were followed for 1 year starting from the first dispensation. Socioeconomic position and drug prescriptions were respectively obtained from tax registry and outpatient prescription database. The effect of socioeconomic characteristics on standardized incidence rate (SIR) of new users of antihypertensive agents, odds ratio (OR) of using combined antihypertensive agents and non-antihypertensive drugs and hazard ratio (HR) of discontinuing antihypertensive therapy were estimated after adjustment for potential confounders. SIRs were 3.7 and 4.2 per 1000 person-months among persons at the lowest and intermediate income, respectively, and 2.4 and 3.0 among immigrants and Italians, respectively. Compared to persons at the highest income, those at the lowest income had increased chances of starting with combined antihypertensive drugs (OR: 1.1; 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.0, 1.2), and of using drugs for heart failure (OR:1.5; CIs:1.3, 1.6) and diabetes (OR: 1.7; CIs: 1.6, 1.9). Compared with Italians, non-western immigrants had increased chances of starting with combined antihypertensive agents (OR: 1.2; CIs: 1.0, 1.3), of using drugs for heart failure (OR: 1.2; CIs: 1.0, 1.4) and for diabetes (OR: 1.8; CIs: 1.6, 2.1), and of interrupting antihypertensive therapy (HR: 1.1; 95% CIs: 1.0, 1.2). Despite the universal health coverage of the Italian National Health Service (NHS), social disparities affect accessing and keeping antihypertensive therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Hypertension
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Antihypertensive Agents
Drug Therapy
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Heart Failure
Universal Coverage
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Databases
Drug Prescriptions
National Health Programs
Italy
Prescriptions
Registries
Cohort Studies
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Incidence
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Do socioeconomic disparities affect accessing and keeping antihypertensive drug therapy? Evidence from an Italian population-based study. / Corrao, G.; Zambon, A.; Parodi, A.; Mezzanzanica, M.; Merlino, L.; Cesana, G.; Mancia, G.

In: Journal of Human Hypertension, Vol. 23, No. 4, 2009, p. 238-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Corrao, G. ; Zambon, A. ; Parodi, A. ; Mezzanzanica, M. ; Merlino, L. ; Cesana, G. ; Mancia, G. / Do socioeconomic disparities affect accessing and keeping antihypertensive drug therapy? Evidence from an Italian population-based study. In: Journal of Human Hypertension. 2009 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 238-244.
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