Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?

Marta Piccioli, Federico Vigevano, Carla Buttinelli, D. G A Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determined whether epileptic clinical manifestations evoked by playing video games (VG) differ from those evoked by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) or striped patterns (P). We exposed nine children who had TV- and VG-evoked seizures in daily life to 12 VG after standardized photic stimulation and pattern stimulation. Their EEGs were recorded continuously, analyzed, and then correlated with a video of their behavior. Similar types of clinical signs were seen during VG, P, and IPS, but the signs we observed were more subtle during the VG. Eight patients showed a clear lateralization. A new observation was the lowering of the eyelids to a state of half-closed. Our study suggests that the type of visual stimulus provoking a photoparoxysmal response or seizure is not particularly relevant. The children belonged to different epilepsy groups, and our findings add to the discussion on the boundaries of the epilepsy types.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-530
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

Video Games
Epilepsy
Photic Stimulation
Seizures
Eyelids
Electroencephalography
Observation

Keywords

  • Children
  • Classification
  • Clinical symptomatology
  • Electroencephalogram
  • Epilepsy
  • Epileptiform discharges
  • Photoparoxysmal response
  • Video games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Piccioli, M., Vigevano, F., Buttinelli, C., & Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, D. G. A. (2005). Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures? Epilepsy and Behavior, 7(3), 524-530. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2005.07.022

Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures? / Piccioli, Marta; Vigevano, Federico; Buttinelli, Carla; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, D. G A.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 7, No. 3, 11.2005, p. 524-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piccioli, M, Vigevano, F, Buttinelli, C & Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, DGA 2005, 'Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?', Epilepsy and Behavior, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 524-530. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2005.07.022
Piccioli, Marta ; Vigevano, Federico ; Buttinelli, Carla ; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, D. G A. / Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?. In: Epilepsy and Behavior. 2005 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 524-530.
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