Docetaxel administered every two weeks as second-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: A phase II study

Luigi De Petris, Maria Rita Migliorino, Anna Ceribelli, Olga Martelli, Michele Di Molfetta, Andrea Mancuso, Stefano De Santis, Roberto Di Salvia, Filippo De Marinis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of single-agent docetaxel, administered every two weeks as second-line treatment for patients with recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: Forty-eight patients with confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in this trial The median age was 56.5 years (range 43-76), median PS was 1, and the main histology type was adenocarcinoma (54%). Only 8% of patients had previously received paclitaxel. Patients received docetaxel i.v., 50 mg/m 2 over 1 hour, on day 1 every 2 weeks. Results: The overall response rate was 8.3% (95% Confidence Interval 0.5-16.1%). The median time to disease progression, median survival time and 1-year survival rate were 3 months, 6 months and 21%, respectively. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was registered in 47% of patients, with only 1 patient (2%) experiencing febrile neutropenia. Non-hematological toxicity was mild (grade 1-2) and consisted mainly of asthenia (19%) and diarrhea (10%). Conclusion: The bi-weekly schedule of docetaxel showed an activity comparable to the standard tri-weekfy 75 mg/m2 schedule as second-line treatment for recurrent NSCLC. Though non-hematological toxicity is significantly reduced, myelosuppression is still a matter of concern.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4713-4717
Number of pages5
JournalAnticancer Research
Volume25
Issue number6 C
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

Keywords

  • Docetaxel
  • Non-small cell lung cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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