Does a meditation protocol supported by a mobile application help people reduce stress? suggestions from a controlled pragmatic trial

Claudia Carissoli, Daniela Villani, Giuseppe Riva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of a 3 week mindfulness inspired protocol, delivered by an Android application for smartphones, in reducing stress in the adult population. By using a controlled pragmatic trial, a self-help intervention group of meditators was compared with a typical control group listening to relaxing music and a waiting list group. The final sample included 56 Italian workers as participants, block randomized to the three conditions. The self-reported level of perceived stress was assessed at the beginning and at the end of the protocol. Participants were also instructed to track their heart rate before and after each session. The results did not show any significant differences between groups, but both self-help intervention groups demonstrated an improvement in coping with stress. Nevertheless, meditators and music listeners reported a significant decrease in average heartbeats per minute after each session. Furthermore, both groups perceived a moderate but significant change in stress reduction perceptions, even if with some peculiarities. Limitations and opportunities related to the meditation protocol supported by the mobile application to reduce stress are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-53
Number of pages8
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pragmatic Clinical Trials
Mobile Applications
Meditation
meditation
Self-Help Groups
Music
pragmatics
Mindfulness
Waiting Lists
Group
Heart Rate
self-help
Control Groups
Smartphones
music
Population
listener
coping
worker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Applied Psychology
  • Communication
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Social Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does a meditation protocol supported by a mobile application help people reduce stress? suggestions from a controlled pragmatic trial. / Carissoli, Claudia; Villani, Daniela; Riva, Giuseppe.

In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 46-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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