Does field independence predict visuo-spatial abilities underpinning human navigation? Behavioural evidence

Maddalena Boccia, Laura Piccardi, Mariangela Di Marco, Luigi Pizzamiglio, Cecilia Guariglia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Field independence (FI) has been defined as the extent to which the individual perceives part of a field as discrete from the surrounding field, rather than embedded in the field. It has been proposed to represent a relatively stable pattern in individuals’ predisposition towards information processing. In the present study, we assessed the effect of FI on skills underpinning human navigation. Fifty Healthy individuals took part in this study. FI has been assessed by using the group embedded figures test (GEFT). Participants were also asked to perform several visuo-spatial orientation tasks, including the perspective taking/spatial orientation test (PTSOT), the mental rotation task (MRT) and the vividness task, as well as the Santa Barbara Sense of Direction Scale, a self-reported questionnaire, which has been found to predict environmental spatial orientation ability. We found that performances on the GEFT significantly predicted performances on the PTSOT and the MRT. This result supports the idea that FI predicts human navigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Brain Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - May 25 2016

Keywords

  • Field dependence
  • Mental rotation
  • Perspective taking
  • Sense of direction
  • Spatial orientation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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