Does gender affect the association between right ventricular strain and arterial hypertension?

Marijana Tadic, Cesare Cuspidi, Branislava Ivanovic, Biljana Pencic, Guido Grassi, Vera Celic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The importance of right ventricular (RV) structure and function in cardiovascular and total morbidity and mortality has been confirmed previously. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of gender on RV structure and function in untreated hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional study included 243 subjects who underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and comprehensive echocardiographic examination including strain evaluation. There was no difference in RV diameter between hypertensive and normotensive women and men. RV wall thickness, right atrial volume index (RAVI), and tricuspid E/e' ratio were significantly higher in hypertensive women and men than in their normotensive counterparts. RV global longitudinal and RV free wall longitudinal strains were significantly lower in hypertensive women and men than in their normotensive counterparts. Arterial hypertension affected RV wall thickness, RAVI, tricuspid E/e', and RV longitudinal strain. Gender affected RV diameter, RAVI, tricuspid E/e', and RV longitudinal strain, whereas hypertension-gender interaction affected RAVI, E/e', and RV longitudinal strain. The 24-hour systolic BP and LV mass index were independently associated with RV free wall longitudinal strain. RV wall thickness was independently associated with RV free wall longitudinal strain only in women, and tricuspid E/e' was independently associated only in men. In conclusion, RV longitudinal strain was significantly decreased in hypertensive patients in both sexes. Hypertensive men suffered more evident RV mechanical changes than hypertensive women. Gender, arterial hypertension, and their interaction had the important role in RV structural and mechanical remodeling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1327-1333
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

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Hypertension
Right Ventricular Function
Blood Pressure
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Cross-Sectional Studies
Morbidity
Mortality

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Does gender affect the association between right ventricular strain and arterial hypertension? / Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Ivanovic, Branislava; Pencic, Biljana; Grassi, Guido; Celic, Vera.

In: Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.), Vol. 20, No. 9, 09.2018, p. 1327-1333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tadic, Marijana ; Cuspidi, Cesare ; Ivanovic, Branislava ; Pencic, Biljana ; Grassi, Guido ; Celic, Vera. / Does gender affect the association between right ventricular strain and arterial hypertension?. In: Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.). 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 9. pp. 1327-1333.
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AU - Celic, Vera

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