Does googling for preconception care result in information consistent with international guidelines: A comparison of information found by Italian women of childbearing age and health professionals

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Abstract

Background: Preconception counseling is effective in reducing the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The Internet is commonly used by women and health professionals to search for health information. We compared the consistency of preconception information found on the Internet with the recommendations published by American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (AJOG) simulating a web search by women of childbearing age and health professionals. Methods. We reviewed websites resulting from a Google search performed using search strings selected by Italian women of childbearing age and health professionals. We investigated if retrieved information was consistent with AJOG recommendations for preconception care. Logistic regression was used to compare presence of consistent recommendations between women and health professionals. Results: The highest frequency of correct recommendations was found for folic acid supplementation (39.4% of websites). Consistency of preconception information did not significantly differ between search strategies except for folic acid supplementation. "Communities and blogs" website category provided less frequently correct recommendations compared with "Medical/Public Agency" category (i.e. folic acid supplementation (aOR 0.254; CI 0.098-0.664; p =

Original languageEnglish
Article number14
JournalBMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Adverse pregnancy outcomes
  • Folic acid
  • Google
  • Health information
  • Internet
  • Preconception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Policy

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