Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide: Risk of Graft Failure, Poor Graft Function, and Impact on Outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) is associated with a 10-fold increased risk of graft failure in haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haplo-SCT). Consensus guidelines from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation set a mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) >1000 as a cutoff for DSA positivity. In the absence of an alternative donor, it is recommended that patients undergo desensitization therapy, especially with high DSA levels (>5000 MFI). The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of DSA on risk of graft failure and poor graft function, as well as on major outcomes in a consecutive cohort of patients who were systematically screened for DSA before haplo-SCT. A total of 141 consecutive patients were candidates for unmanipulated haplo-SCT with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) at our center between January 2012 and January 2018, and 135 were analyzed for the presence of HLA antibodies. Of these 134 patients underwent haplo-SCT. HLA antibodies were detected in 40 patients, including 19 with DSA and 21 without DSA. Ten of the 19 patients with DSA underwent transplantation using that donor, whereas 2 underwent a desensitization program before transplantation. Only 2 patients experienced primary graft failure (1.4 %), both of whom were without DSA. Twenty patients developed a poor graft function (15%). The 3-year overall survival (OS), 3-year progression-free survival (PFS), and 1-year nonrelapse mortality (NRM) were analyzed according to the presence or absence of DSA. No statistically significant difference was found. No impact of the presence of DSA on the risk of developing graft failure and poor graft function was revealed. Major outcomes of transplantation were analyzed separately in patients with poor graft function and those with good graft function. The 3-year OS, 3-year PFS, and 1-year NRM in good graft function and poor graft function populations were 62% versus 20% (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1395-1406
Number of pages12
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies
  • Graft failure
  • Haploidentical stem cell transplantation
  • Poor graft function
  • Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide

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