Dopamine function in obsessive compulsive disorder: Cortisol response to acute apomorphine stimulation

F. Brambilla, G. Perna, R. Bussi, L. Bellodi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Central dopaminergic dysfunction has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In 15 patients with OCD and in 15 age-sex matched controls we evaluated the dopamine (DA) function by measuring the cortisol (CORT) responses to stimulation with the DA agonist apomorphine (APO). The CORT response to acute saline administration was also measured, to exclude the existence of a pathology of the circadian secretion of the hormone which could obscure the significance of the CORT response to APO stimulation. Basal levels of CORT were the same in patients and controls, but the values after saline administration were significantly higher in patients than in controls. APO stimulation-induced CORT rises were significantly higher in patients than in controls, but when the data after APO were corrected for those after saline, there were no significant difference between the two groups of subjects. Our data suggest that there are no alterations of the central dopaminergic function connected with the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in OCD. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-310
Number of pages10
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Apomorphine test
  • Cortisol
  • Dopamine function
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dopamine function in obsessive compulsive disorder: Cortisol response to acute apomorphine stimulation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this