Dopamine receptor D2 Ser/Cys 311 variant is associated with delusion and disorganization symptomatology in major psychoses

A. Serretti, E. Lattuada, C. Lorenzi, R. Lilli, E. Smeraldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The D2 receptor (DRD2) is a binding site of many psychoactive drugs and it has been proposed as a genetic risk factor for psychiatric disorders. The aim of this investigation was to study the DRD2 S311C variant in major psychoses. We studied 1182 inpatients with diagnoses of bipolar disorder (n = 480), major depressive disorder (n = 269), schizophrenia (n = 366), delusional disorder (n = 44), psychotic disorder not otherwise specified (n = 23) and 267 healthy controls. Eight hundred and eighty-seven subjects were also scored for their lifetime symptomatology using the the Operational Criteria checklist for psychotic illness (OPCRIT). DRD2 variants were not associated with affected subjects even when possible confounders like gender and onset were considered. When we considered the 887 subjects with the symptomatologic analysis, we observed a significant association of the DRD2 S311C variant with both delusion and disorganization features. The association was present independently from diagnoses. Our results do not show that coding variants of the DRD2 S311C play a major role in conferring susceptibility to major psychoses, but they may be connected with disorganized and delusional symptomatology independently from diagnoses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-274
Number of pages5
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume5
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Depressive disorder
  • Dopamine receptors
  • Linkage disequilibrium
  • Paranoid disorder
  • Psychopathology
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dopamine receptor D2 Ser/Cys 311 variant is associated with delusion and disorganization symptomatology in major psychoses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this