Dose of desferrioxamine and evolution of HIV-1 infection in thalassaemic patients

D. G. Costagliola, M. De Montalembert, J. J. Lefrere, C. Briand, P. Rebulla, S. Baruchel, C. Dessi, P. Fondu, M. Karagiorga, H. Perrimond, R. Girot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To study the relationship between the dose of desferrioxamine (DFX)) and the progression of the HIV-1 disease in thalassaemia major patients (TMP), 64 seropositive TMP patients were studied. Cumulative incidence of CDC stage IV was calculated using a non-parametric life-table method. The association with the mean daily dose of DFX was tested with a Cox proportional hazards model which was also used to adjust for confounding variables. The median of the mean daily dose of DFX over the seropositive period was 40 mg/kg (range 0-65 mg/kg). Age at seroconversion (P <0.02) and splenectomy (P <0.03) were found to be associated with the mean daily dose of DFX. 6.5 years after seroconversion. 11% of those who had been prescribed more than 40 mg/kg of DFX daily had entered stage IV versus 35% of those who had been prescribed a lower dose (P <0.01). When the dose was taken as a continuous variable it was found that the rate of progression was significantly smaller in TMP receiving a higher dose (P <0.002), even after adjusting for age and splenectomy (P <0.02). Although it should be noted that these results were obtained in an observational study, possibly biased by a non-random allocation of the DFX dose, we believe that they are striking enough to support the claim that the role of DFX in the progression of HIV disease should be further evaluated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)849-852
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume87
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Keywords

  • Desferrioxamine
  • Progression of HIV infection
  • Thallassaemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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