Dubbi del cardiologo davanti ad un elettrocardiogramma che presenta in V1-V3 complessi QRS con onda positiva terminale e sopraslivellamento del segmento ST. Consensus Conference promossa dalla Società Italiana di Cardiologia.

Translated title of the contribution: [Doubts of the cardiologist regarding an electrocardiogram presenting QRS V1-V2 complexes with positive terminal wave and ST segment elevation. Consensus Conference promoted by the Italian Cardiology Society].

Giuseppe Oreto, Domenico Corrado, Pietro Delise, Francesco Fedele, Fiorenzo Gaita, Federico Gentile, Carla Giustetto, Antonio Michelucci, Luigi Padeletti, Silvia Priori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

When an ECG shows (or is suspicious for) a Brugada pattern, i.e., the association of a positive terminal deflection and ST segment elevation in the right precordial leads, the cardiologist often faces several problems. Three important questions are raised by this ECG pattern: (1) is this really a Brugada ECG pattern? (2) How can be determined whether this patient is at risk for sudden death? and (3) Should this patient receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD)? The term "Brugada syndrome" should be restricted to patients who have diagnostic ECG changes, as well as a history of symptoms. Asymptomatic subjects, in contrast, should be categorized as having a "Brugada ECG pattern" rather than the syndrome. Diagnostic ECG (type 1) is characterized by a J wave (a terminal positive wave) whose amplitude is > or =2 mm, and a "coved" type ST segment elevation located in the right precordial leads. These signs are usually present in leads V1 and/or V2 (lead V3 is more rarely involved, and is never the only affected one), but occasionally also can be observed in some of the limb leads. Types 2 and 3 ECGs, which are not truly diagnostic of Brugada pattern, are characterized by a "saddle back" ST segment elevation, that is > or =1 mm in type 2 and

Original languageItalian
JournalGiornale Italiano di Cardiologia
Volume11
Issue number11 Suppl 2
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2010

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Cardiology
Electrocardiography
Brugada Syndrome
Implantable Defibrillators
Sudden Death
Extremities
Cardiologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Dubbi del cardiologo davanti ad un elettrocardiogramma che presenta in V1-V3 complessi QRS con onda positiva terminale e sopraslivellamento del segmento ST. Consensus Conference promossa dalla Società Italiana di Cardiologia. / Oreto, Giuseppe; Corrado, Domenico; Delise, Pietro; Fedele, Francesco; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Gentile, Federico; Giustetto, Carla; Michelucci, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Priori, Silvia.

In: Giornale Italiano di Cardiologia, Vol. 11, No. 11 Suppl 2, 11.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oreto, Giuseppe ; Corrado, Domenico ; Delise, Pietro ; Fedele, Francesco ; Gaita, Fiorenzo ; Gentile, Federico ; Giustetto, Carla ; Michelucci, Antonio ; Padeletti, Luigi ; Priori, Silvia. / Dubbi del cardiologo davanti ad un elettrocardiogramma che presenta in V1-V3 complessi QRS con onda positiva terminale e sopraslivellamento del segmento ST. Consensus Conference promossa dalla Società Italiana di Cardiologia. In: Giornale Italiano di Cardiologia. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 11 Suppl 2.
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AU - Corrado, Domenico

AU - Delise, Pietro

AU - Fedele, Francesco

AU - Gaita, Fiorenzo

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AU - Priori, Silvia

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