Drug-Eluting Stent Restenosis. The Pattern Predicts the Outcome

John Cosgrave, Gloria Melzi, Giuseppe G L Biondi-Zoccai, Flavio Airoldi, Alaide Chieffo, Giuseppe M. Sangiorgi, Matteo Montorfano, Iassen Michev, Mauro Carlino, Erminio Bonizzoni, Antonio Colombo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to determine if the angiographic pattern of in-stent restenosis in drug-eluting stents (DES) maintains its prognostic importance. Background: The pattern of restenosis in the bare-metal stent era had a significant impact on therapeutic outcomes. Methods: We identified a total of 250 consecutive restenotic lesions in 203 patients (66.4% sirolimus-eluting stents and 33.6% paclitaxel-eluting stents). We divided these lesions into two groups: focal, defined as ≤10 mm, 163 lesions (65.2%); and nonfocal, which were diffuse, proliferative, or obstructive, 87 lesions (34.8%). The end points analyzed were angiographic restenosis and target lesion revascularization (TLR). Results: Diabetes was the only clinical variable associated with the pattern of restenosis (28.8% focal compared with 52.9% diffuse; p = 0.0001). Angiographic follow-up of the treatment of restenosis was available in 61.2% of the lesions and was similar between the two groups. The rate of angiographic restenosis was 17.8% in the focal group and 51.1% in the nonfocal group (p = 0.0001). The incidence of TLR also increased with the type of restenosis treated (9.8% and 23%, respectively; p = 0.007). An adjusted multivariate analysis revealed that the pattern of restenosis remained associated with both the occurrence of restenosis and TLR (odds ratio [OR] 5.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 23], p = 0.03; and OR 3.61 [95% CI 1.2 to 10.9], p = 0.02; respectively). Conclusions: Similar to bare-metal stent data, the angiographic pattern of restenosis following DES implantation is prognostically important. Diabetes is a significant predictor of the pattern of restenosis in the DES era.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2399-2404
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume47
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 20 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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