Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee

Translated title of the contribution: Drug hypersensitivity reactions. Part I. Cutaneous manifestations

M. R. Galdiero, P. Triggianese, G. Varricchione, G. Spadaro, A. Genovese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The skin is the most frequently involved target organ in Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR). Clinical manifestations range from maculopapular exanthema (MPE), the most frequent type of drug-induced eruption, to urticaria. Less common but more severe entities are: acute generalized exanthematic pustulosis (AGEP); drug rash with eosino-philia and systemic symptoms (DRESS); Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). While a single drug can elicit a range of reaction patterns, no reaction pattern is specific for a particular drug. Biologic drugs are an effective approach to a number of chronic diseases. These agents induce several dermatologic side effects (such as urticaria and erythema multiforme). The use of biologic drugs is spreading in clinical practice, thus the recognition and management of the related skin reactions are important for patient care. The pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical patterns of cutaneous drug reactions are briefly reviewed in this article.

Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)30-39
Number of pages10
JournalItalian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume20
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Skin Manifestations
Drug Hypersensitivity
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Urticaria
Exanthema
Skin
Erythema Multiforme
Drug Eruptions
Stevens-Johnson Syndrome
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Patient Care
Chronic Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Galdiero, M. R., Triggianese, P., Varricchione, G., Spadaro, G., & Genovese, A. (2010). Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee. Italian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 20(1), 30-39.

Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee. / Galdiero, M. R.; Triggianese, P.; Varricchione, G.; Spadaro, G.; Genovese, A.

In: Italian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 03.2010, p. 30-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Galdiero, MR, Triggianese, P, Varricchione, G, Spadaro, G & Genovese, A 2010, 'Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee', Italian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 30-39.
Galdiero MR, Triggianese P, Varricchione G, Spadaro G, Genovese A. Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee. Italian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2010 Mar;20(1):30-39.
Galdiero, M. R. ; Triggianese, P. ; Varricchione, G. ; Spadaro, G. ; Genovese, A. / Reazioni da ipersensibilità a farmaci. Parte I. Manifestazioni cutanee. In: Italian Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 30-39.
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