Dual activity of aminoarylthiazoles on the trafficking and gating defects of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel caused by cystic fibrosis mutations

Nicoletta Pedemonte, Valeria Tomati, Elvira Sondo, Emanuela Caci, Enrico Millo, Andrea Armirotti, Gianluca Damonte, Olga Zegarra-Moran, Luis J V Galietta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A large fractionofmutations causing cystic fibrosis impair the function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel by causing reduced channel activity (gating defect) and/or impaired exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (trafficking defect). Such defects need to be treated with separate pharmacological compounds termed potentiators and correctors, respectively. Here, we report the characterization of aminoarylthiazoles (AATs) as compounds having dual activity. Cells expressing mutant CFTR were studied with functional assays (fluorescence-based halide transport and short circuit current measurements) to assess the effect of acute and chronic treatment with compounds. We found that AATs are effective on F508del, the most frequent cystic fibrosis mutation, which is associated with both a gating and a trafficking defect. AATs are also effective on mutations like G1349D and G551D, which cause only a gating defect. Evaluation of a panel of AAT analogs identified EN277I as the most effective compound. Incubation of cells expressing mutant CFTR with EN277I caused a strong stimulation of channel activity as demonstrated by single channel recordings. Compounds with dual activity such as AATs may be useful for the development of effective drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15215-15226
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume286
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 29 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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