DXYS156

A multi-purpose short tandem repeat locus for determination of sex, paternal and maternal geographic origins and DNA fingerprinting

Francesco Calì, Peter Forster, Christian Kersting, Mario G. Mirisola, Rosalba D'Anna, Giacomo De Leo, Valentino Romano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In forensic science and in legal medicine Y chromosomal typing is indispensable for sex determination, for paternity testing in the absence of the father and for distinguishing males in multiple rape cases. Another potential application is the estimation of paternal geographic origin or family name from a crime stain to narrow down the range of suspects and thus reduce costs of mass screenings. However, Y typing alone cannot provide a sufficiently resolved DNA fingerprint as required for court convictions. Thus, there is a dilemma whether or not to sacrifice valuable material for the sake of extensive Y chromosomal investigations when stain DNA is limited (typically allowing only few PCR amplifications). We here describe a Y-chromosome-specific nucleotide insertion in the duplicate short tandem repeat (STR) locus DXYS156 which allows us to distinguish males from females as does the commonly used amelogenin system, but with the advantage that this locus is multi-allelic, thus substantially contributing towards DNA fingerprinting of a sample and furthermore enabling the detection of sample contamination. Yet another bonus is that both the X and the Y copies of DXYS156 have alleles specific to different parts of the world, offering separate estimates of maternal and paternal descent of that sample. We therefore recommend the inclusion of DXYS156 in standard multiplexing kits for forensic, archaeological and genealogical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Legal Medicine
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

DNA Fingerprinting
Microsatellite Repeats
Coloring Agents
Mothers
Amelogenin
Forensic Sciences
Mass Screening
Forensic Medicine
Rape
Y Chromosome
Crime
Fathers
Names
Nucleotides
Alleles
rape
environmental pollution
Costs and Cost Analysis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

Keywords

  • Ethnic
  • Evolution
  • Human
  • Phenotype
  • Population
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

DXYS156 : A multi-purpose short tandem repeat locus for determination of sex, paternal and maternal geographic origins and DNA fingerprinting. / Calì, Francesco; Forster, Peter; Kersting, Christian; Mirisola, Mario G.; D'Anna, Rosalba; De Leo, Giacomo; Romano, Valentino.

In: International Journal of Legal Medicine, Vol. 116, No. 3, 2002, p. 133-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Calì, Francesco ; Forster, Peter ; Kersting, Christian ; Mirisola, Mario G. ; D'Anna, Rosalba ; De Leo, Giacomo ; Romano, Valentino. / DXYS156 : A multi-purpose short tandem repeat locus for determination of sex, paternal and maternal geographic origins and DNA fingerprinting. In: International Journal of Legal Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 133-138.
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