Dysgraphia as a mild expression of dystonia in children with absence epilepsy

Renzo Guerrini, Federico Melani, Claudia Brancati, Anna Rita Ferrari, Paola Brovedani, Annibale Biggeri, Laura Grisotto, Simona Pellacani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Absence epilepsy (AE) is etiologically heterogeneous and has at times been associated with idiopathic dystonia. Objectives: Based on the clinical observation that children with AE often exhibit, interictally, a disorder resembling writer's cramp but fully definable as dysgraphia, we tested the hypothesis that in this particular population dysgraphia would represent a subtle expression of dystonia. Methods: We ascertained the prevalence of dysgraphia in 82 children with AE (mean age 9.7) and average intelligence and compared them with 89 age-, gender- and class-matched healthy children (mean age 10.57) using tests for handwriting fluency and quality, based on which we divided patients and controls into four subgroups: AE/dysgraphia, AE without dysgraphia, controls with dysgraphia and healthy controls. We compared the blink reflex recovery cycle in children belonging to all four subgroups. Results: We identified dysgraphia in 17/82 children with AE and in 7/89 controls (20.7 vs 7.8%; P = 0.016) with the former having a 3.4-times higher risk of dysgraphia regardless of age and gender (odd ratio: 3.49; 95% CI 1.2, 8.8%). The AE/dysgraphia subgroup performed worse than controls with dysgraphia in one test of handwriting fluency (P = 0.037) and in most trials testing handwriting quality (P<0.02). In children with AE/dysgraphia the blink reflex showed no suppression at short interstimulus intervals, with a difference for each value emerging when comparing the study group with the three remaining subgroups (P

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0130883
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2015

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Agraphia
Absence Epilepsy
Dystonia
epilepsy
Handwriting
reflexes
Blinking
gender
testing
odds ratio
Recovery
Dystonic Disorders
Testing
Intelligence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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Dysgraphia as a mild expression of dystonia in children with absence epilepsy. / Guerrini, Renzo; Melani, Federico; Brancati, Claudia; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Brovedani, Paola; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Pellacani, Simona.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 7, e0130883, 01.07.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guerrini, Renzo ; Melani, Federico ; Brancati, Claudia ; Ferrari, Anna Rita ; Brovedani, Paola ; Biggeri, Annibale ; Grisotto, Laura ; Pellacani, Simona. / Dysgraphia as a mild expression of dystonia in children with absence epilepsy. In: PLoS One. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 7.
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