e-NO peak versus e-NO plateau values in evaluating e-NO production in steroid-naive and in steroid-treated asthmatic children and in detecting response to inhaled steroid treatment

Michela Silvestri, Daniela Spallarossa, Elena Battistini, Bruno Fregonese, Giovanni A. Rossi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Airway nitric oxide (NO) production can be measured by chemiluminescence analyzer in children able to perform a single low exhalation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether exhaled NO (e-NO) peaks (first part of the exhalation) were as useful as e-NO plateaus (last part of the exhalation) in evaluating e-NO production in asthmatic children and in detecting responses to inhaled steroid treatment. E-NO peak, plateau, and rate of production values were measured in 100 atopic asthmatic children using a chemiluminescence analyser. Thirty-seven patients (mean age, 11.1±0.7 years) were receiving inhaled steroids (flunisolide, 0.8-1 mg daily) or beclomethasone (0.2-0.4 mg daily), while the remaining 63 (mean age, 12.0±0.4 yrs) were-steroid naive and treated only with inhaled β2-agonists on an as-needed basis. Fifteen out of the 63 steroid-naive patients were reevaluated after a short course (3 weeks) of inhaled corticosteroid treatment (flunisolide, 0.8-1 mg daily, or beclomethasone, 0.2-0.4 mg daily). Regardless of the type of data analysis (peak, plateau, or rate of production), the e-NO values of the steroid-naive patients were significantly higher than those of inhaled steroid-treated patients (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-43
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Pulmonology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Allergy
  • Asthma
  • Children
  • Nitric oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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