Early angiographic changes after laser treatment of choroidal neovascularisation in age-related macular degeneration

M. Battaglia Parodi, S. Da Pozzo, G. Ravalico

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To describe angiographic features detectable on fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) early after laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Thirty-five eyes of patients with AMD and juxtafoveal or extrafoveal CNV referred to the angiographic centre of the Eye Clinic of Trieste were considered. Ophthalmological assessment included FA and ICGA performed 2 days before and 30 min after laser treatment, and then 1, 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after photocoagulation. Further clinical angiographic examinations were carried out 2, 3, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Photocoagulation was performed for classic CNV on FA and occult CNV on FA, appearing as well-defined focal spot on ICGA. Results: Our results show that interpretation of early post-treatment angiographic examinations may be awkward because diffuse leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are normally detectable soon after laser treatment and thereafter during the first 2 weeks. Later, at the 3-week control, leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are visible in 62.8% and in 37% of cases respectively; they disappear completely by the 4-week control. Conclusion: Difficulty in analysing FA and ICGA in the early post-photocoagulation period underlines the importance of the decision regarding when to perform the first reliable post-laser control and how to improve its interpretation. We suggest that the first angiographic control be performed 3 weeks after treatment, strictly monitoring those eyes showing leakage or marginal hot spots over the following weeks. Overlapping the post-laser hypofluorescent area on the pre-laser lesion can ensure the complete coverage of CNV, and analysis of the retinal and choroidal vascular pattern inside and near the photocoagulated area during the different angiographic phases, albeit difficult, is essential for the interpretation of the angiographic lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)900-908
Number of pages9
JournalGraefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Volume239
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Choroidal Neovascularization
Fluorescein Angiography
Macular Degeneration
Indocyanine Green
Lasers
Angiography
Light Coagulation
Therapeutics
Retinal Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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title = "Early angiographic changes after laser treatment of choroidal neovascularisation in age-related macular degeneration",
abstract = "Purpose: To describe angiographic features detectable on fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) early after laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Thirty-five eyes of patients with AMD and juxtafoveal or extrafoveal CNV referred to the angiographic centre of the Eye Clinic of Trieste were considered. Ophthalmological assessment included FA and ICGA performed 2 days before and 30 min after laser treatment, and then 1, 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after photocoagulation. Further clinical angiographic examinations were carried out 2, 3, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Photocoagulation was performed for classic CNV on FA and occult CNV on FA, appearing as well-defined focal spot on ICGA. Results: Our results show that interpretation of early post-treatment angiographic examinations may be awkward because diffuse leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are normally detectable soon after laser treatment and thereafter during the first 2 weeks. Later, at the 3-week control, leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are visible in 62.8{\%} and in 37{\%} of cases respectively; they disappear completely by the 4-week control. Conclusion: Difficulty in analysing FA and ICGA in the early post-photocoagulation period underlines the importance of the decision regarding when to perform the first reliable post-laser control and how to improve its interpretation. We suggest that the first angiographic control be performed 3 weeks after treatment, strictly monitoring those eyes showing leakage or marginal hot spots over the following weeks. Overlapping the post-laser hypofluorescent area on the pre-laser lesion can ensure the complete coverage of CNV, and analysis of the retinal and choroidal vascular pattern inside and near the photocoagulated area during the different angiographic phases, albeit difficult, is essential for the interpretation of the angiographic lesions.",
author = "{Battaglia Parodi}, M. and {Da Pozzo}, S. and G. Ravalico",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
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T1 - Early angiographic changes after laser treatment of choroidal neovascularisation in age-related macular degeneration

AU - Battaglia Parodi, M.

AU - Da Pozzo, S.

AU - Ravalico, G.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Purpose: To describe angiographic features detectable on fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) early after laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Thirty-five eyes of patients with AMD and juxtafoveal or extrafoveal CNV referred to the angiographic centre of the Eye Clinic of Trieste were considered. Ophthalmological assessment included FA and ICGA performed 2 days before and 30 min after laser treatment, and then 1, 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after photocoagulation. Further clinical angiographic examinations were carried out 2, 3, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Photocoagulation was performed for classic CNV on FA and occult CNV on FA, appearing as well-defined focal spot on ICGA. Results: Our results show that interpretation of early post-treatment angiographic examinations may be awkward because diffuse leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are normally detectable soon after laser treatment and thereafter during the first 2 weeks. Later, at the 3-week control, leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are visible in 62.8% and in 37% of cases respectively; they disappear completely by the 4-week control. Conclusion: Difficulty in analysing FA and ICGA in the early post-photocoagulation period underlines the importance of the decision regarding when to perform the first reliable post-laser control and how to improve its interpretation. We suggest that the first angiographic control be performed 3 weeks after treatment, strictly monitoring those eyes showing leakage or marginal hot spots over the following weeks. Overlapping the post-laser hypofluorescent area on the pre-laser lesion can ensure the complete coverage of CNV, and analysis of the retinal and choroidal vascular pattern inside and near the photocoagulated area during the different angiographic phases, albeit difficult, is essential for the interpretation of the angiographic lesions.

AB - Purpose: To describe angiographic features detectable on fluorescein angiography (FA) and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) early after laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: Thirty-five eyes of patients with AMD and juxtafoveal or extrafoveal CNV referred to the angiographic centre of the Eye Clinic of Trieste were considered. Ophthalmological assessment included FA and ICGA performed 2 days before and 30 min after laser treatment, and then 1, 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after photocoagulation. Further clinical angiographic examinations were carried out 2, 3, 4 and 6 months after treatment. Photocoagulation was performed for classic CNV on FA and occult CNV on FA, appearing as well-defined focal spot on ICGA. Results: Our results show that interpretation of early post-treatment angiographic examinations may be awkward because diffuse leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are normally detectable soon after laser treatment and thereafter during the first 2 weeks. Later, at the 3-week control, leakage on FA and hot spots on ICGA are visible in 62.8% and in 37% of cases respectively; they disappear completely by the 4-week control. Conclusion: Difficulty in analysing FA and ICGA in the early post-photocoagulation period underlines the importance of the decision regarding when to perform the first reliable post-laser control and how to improve its interpretation. We suggest that the first angiographic control be performed 3 weeks after treatment, strictly monitoring those eyes showing leakage or marginal hot spots over the following weeks. Overlapping the post-laser hypofluorescent area on the pre-laser lesion can ensure the complete coverage of CNV, and analysis of the retinal and choroidal vascular pattern inside and near the photocoagulated area during the different angiographic phases, albeit difficult, is essential for the interpretation of the angiographic lesions.

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