Early invasive diagnostic techniques in pregnant women who are infected with the HIV: A multicenter case series

Edgardo Somigliana, Anna Maria Bucceri, Cecilia Tibaldi, Salvatore Alberico, Marina Ravizza, Valeria Savasi, Silvia Marini, Roberta Matrone, Giorgio Pardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Studies that mostly were conducted before the widespread use of combination antiretroviral treatments have reported that antenatal invasive procedures markedly increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus vertical transmission. We aimed to evaluate the vertical transmission rate and other maternal and neonatal complications among women who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus who underwent antenatal invasive procedures during the second trimester of pregnancy and who were delivered after the advent of antiretroviral regimens. Study design: We conducted a multicenter case series of women who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus who underwent amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling or cordocentesis during the second trimester of pregnancy and who were delivered after January 1, 1997. Results: Sixty-three of 775 recruited women (8.1%) had performed early invasive diagnostic techniques. This rate has improved progressively from 4% in 1997 to 14%. Two of 60 viable infants (3.3%; 95% CI, 0.6%-10.1%) were infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. This rate did not differ significantly from the transmission rate that was observed in women who did not undergo antenatal invasive techniques (1.7%; P = .30). Conclusion: The current risk of human immunodeficiency virus vertical transmission that is associated with early invasive diagnostic techniques is lower than previously reported.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)437-442
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume193
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

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Keywords

  • Amniocentesis
  • Chorionic villus sampling
  • Cordocentesis
  • Human immunodeficiency virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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