Early-onset metabolic syndrome in prepubertal obese children and the possible role of alanine aminotransferase as marker of metabolic syndrome

V. Calcaterra, T. Muratori, C. Klersy, R. Albertini, C. Caramagna, V. Brizzi, D. Larizza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Obesity is often associated with increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and elevation of ALT is a marker of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease which is caused in part by insulin resistance, the essential characteristic of metabolic syndrome (MS). We evaluated the prevalence of MS in prepubertal obese children and the usefulness of ALT as an MS marker. Patients: 120 obese children (6.3 ± 1.6 years old) and 50 normal-weight controls (5.3 ± 2.0 years old) were included. Patients were classified as having MS if they met ≥3 of the following criteria: body mass index >97th percentile, triglycerides >95th percentile, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 95th percentile, fasting blood glucose 100 mg/dl and/or impaired insulin sensitivity with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance >97.5th percentile. ALT levels were also evaluated. Results: MS occurred in 16.6% of obese patients. Significant differences were present in body mass index (p <0.001), SBP (p = 0.002) and DBP (p <0.001) between non-MS and MS obese patients; laboratory data, except total cholesterol, were significantly different in the two groups. The strongest association with MS (as evaluated by the c-statistic) was found for insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (c = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively); also, DBP and SBP showed good discrimination ability (c = 0.73 and 0.72, respectively). ALT levels in the MS group were higher than in the non-MS group (p = 0.02) and associated with MS (p = 0.001; c = 0.69). Conclusion: MS is a consequence of obesity already in very young children. Also, pathological serum ALT levels were significantly correlated with MS and might be considered a marker for defining MS, though confirmation in a longitudinal study is called for.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Alanine Transaminase
Insulin Resistance
Body Mass Index
Homeostasis
Obesity
Aptitude
Serum
HDL Cholesterol
Longitudinal Studies
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Triglycerides
Cholesterol

Keywords

  • Alanine aminotransferase
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Obesity
  • Prepubertal children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{2c55fb5816c1413e9a3906d6d9ad8c94,
title = "Early-onset metabolic syndrome in prepubertal obese children and the possible role of alanine aminotransferase as marker of metabolic syndrome",
abstract = "Introduction: Obesity is often associated with increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and elevation of ALT is a marker of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease which is caused in part by insulin resistance, the essential characteristic of metabolic syndrome (MS). We evaluated the prevalence of MS in prepubertal obese children and the usefulness of ALT as an MS marker. Patients: 120 obese children (6.3 ± 1.6 years old) and 50 normal-weight controls (5.3 ± 2.0 years old) were included. Patients were classified as having MS if they met ≥3 of the following criteria: body mass index >97th percentile, triglycerides >95th percentile, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 95th percentile, fasting blood glucose 100 mg/dl and/or impaired insulin sensitivity with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance >97.5th percentile. ALT levels were also evaluated. Results: MS occurred in 16.6{\%} of obese patients. Significant differences were present in body mass index (p <0.001), SBP (p = 0.002) and DBP (p <0.001) between non-MS and MS obese patients; laboratory data, except total cholesterol, were significantly different in the two groups. The strongest association with MS (as evaluated by the c-statistic) was found for insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (c = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively); also, DBP and SBP showed good discrimination ability (c = 0.73 and 0.72, respectively). ALT levels in the MS group were higher than in the non-MS group (p = 0.02) and associated with MS (p = 0.001; c = 0.69). Conclusion: MS is a consequence of obesity already in very young children. Also, pathological serum ALT levels were significantly correlated with MS and might be considered a marker for defining MS, though confirmation in a longitudinal study is called for.",
keywords = "Alanine aminotransferase, Metabolic syndrome, Obesity, Prepubertal children",
author = "V. Calcaterra and T. Muratori and C. Klersy and R. Albertini and C. Caramagna and V. Brizzi and D. Larizza",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Early-onset metabolic syndrome in prepubertal obese children and the possible role of alanine aminotransferase as marker of metabolic syndrome

AU - Calcaterra, V.

AU - Muratori, T.

AU - Klersy, C.

AU - Albertini, R.

AU - Caramagna, C.

AU - Brizzi, V.

AU - Larizza, D.

PY - 2011/10

Y1 - 2011/10

N2 - Introduction: Obesity is often associated with increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and elevation of ALT is a marker of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease which is caused in part by insulin resistance, the essential characteristic of metabolic syndrome (MS). We evaluated the prevalence of MS in prepubertal obese children and the usefulness of ALT as an MS marker. Patients: 120 obese children (6.3 ± 1.6 years old) and 50 normal-weight controls (5.3 ± 2.0 years old) were included. Patients were classified as having MS if they met ≥3 of the following criteria: body mass index >97th percentile, triglycerides >95th percentile, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 95th percentile, fasting blood glucose 100 mg/dl and/or impaired insulin sensitivity with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance >97.5th percentile. ALT levels were also evaluated. Results: MS occurred in 16.6% of obese patients. Significant differences were present in body mass index (p <0.001), SBP (p = 0.002) and DBP (p <0.001) between non-MS and MS obese patients; laboratory data, except total cholesterol, were significantly different in the two groups. The strongest association with MS (as evaluated by the c-statistic) was found for insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (c = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively); also, DBP and SBP showed good discrimination ability (c = 0.73 and 0.72, respectively). ALT levels in the MS group were higher than in the non-MS group (p = 0.02) and associated with MS (p = 0.001; c = 0.69). Conclusion: MS is a consequence of obesity already in very young children. Also, pathological serum ALT levels were significantly correlated with MS and might be considered a marker for defining MS, though confirmation in a longitudinal study is called for.

AB - Introduction: Obesity is often associated with increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and elevation of ALT is a marker of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease which is caused in part by insulin resistance, the essential characteristic of metabolic syndrome (MS). We evaluated the prevalence of MS in prepubertal obese children and the usefulness of ALT as an MS marker. Patients: 120 obese children (6.3 ± 1.6 years old) and 50 normal-weight controls (5.3 ± 2.0 years old) were included. Patients were classified as having MS if they met ≥3 of the following criteria: body mass index >97th percentile, triglycerides >95th percentile, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 95th percentile, fasting blood glucose 100 mg/dl and/or impaired insulin sensitivity with homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance >97.5th percentile. ALT levels were also evaluated. Results: MS occurred in 16.6% of obese patients. Significant differences were present in body mass index (p <0.001), SBP (p = 0.002) and DBP (p <0.001) between non-MS and MS obese patients; laboratory data, except total cholesterol, were significantly different in the two groups. The strongest association with MS (as evaluated by the c-statistic) was found for insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (c = 0.92 and 0.91, respectively); also, DBP and SBP showed good discrimination ability (c = 0.73 and 0.72, respectively). ALT levels in the MS group were higher than in the non-MS group (p = 0.02) and associated with MS (p = 0.001; c = 0.69). Conclusion: MS is a consequence of obesity already in very young children. Also, pathological serum ALT levels were significantly correlated with MS and might be considered a marker for defining MS, though confirmation in a longitudinal study is called for.

KW - Alanine aminotransferase

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Obesity

KW - Prepubertal children

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