Early or late fresh frozen plasma administration in newborns and small infants undergoing cardiac surgery: the APPEAR randomized trial

Surgical and Clinical Outcome REsearch (SCORE) Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In newborns and small infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and blood priming, it is unclear whether there is reduced blood loss if fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is added to the CPB priming volume. This single-centre, randomized trial tested the hypothesis that the administration of FFP after CPB (late FFP group) is superior to FFP priming (early FFP group) in terms of postoperative bleeding and overall red blood cell (RBC) transfusion.

Methods: Seventy-three infants weighing <10 kg were randomly allocated to receive FFP to supplement RBCs in the CPB priming solution ( n =36) or immediately after CPB ( n =37). The primary endpoint was a difference in postoperative blood loss; secondary endpoints included the amount of RBCs and FFP transfused through the first 48 postoperative hours.

Results: All patients were included in the analysis. Patients in the late FFP arm had greater postoperative mean blood loss than patients in the early FFP arm [33.1 ( sd 20.6) vs 24.1 (12.9) ml kg -1 ; P =0.028], but no differences in transfusions were found. The subgroup of cyanotic heart disease patients had comparable results, but with greater use of RBCs in the late FFP group.

Conclusions: In infants undergoing cardiac surgery, FFP in the priming solution appears slightly superior to late administration in terms of postoperative bleeding.

Clinical trial registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT02738190.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)788-796
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume118
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2017

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Thoracic Surgery
Newborn Infant
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Postoperative Hemorrhage
Hemorrhage
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Heart Diseases
Clinical Trials

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Early or late fresh frozen plasma administration in newborns and small infants undergoing cardiac surgery : the APPEAR randomized trial. / Surgical and Clinical Outcome REsearch (SCORE) Group.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 118, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 788-796.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: In newborns and small infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and blood priming, it is unclear whether there is reduced blood loss if fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is added to the CPB priming volume. This single-centre, randomized trial tested the hypothesis that the administration of FFP after CPB (late FFP group) is superior to FFP priming (early FFP group) in terms of postoperative bleeding and overall red blood cell (RBC) transfusion.Methods: Seventy-three infants weighing <10 kg were randomly allocated to receive FFP to supplement RBCs in the CPB priming solution ( n =36) or immediately after CPB ( n =37). The primary endpoint was a difference in postoperative blood loss; secondary endpoints included the amount of RBCs and FFP transfused through the first 48 postoperative hours.Results: All patients were included in the analysis. Patients in the late FFP arm had greater postoperative mean blood loss than patients in the early FFP arm [33.1 ( sd 20.6) vs 24.1 (12.9) ml kg -1 ; P =0.028], but no differences in transfusions were found. The subgroup of cyanotic heart disease patients had comparable results, but with greater use of RBCs in the late FFP group.Conclusions: In infants undergoing cardiac surgery, FFP in the priming solution appears slightly superior to late administration in terms of postoperative bleeding.Clinical trial registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov , NCT02738190.",
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