Early outcome prediction on 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We investigated the role of 18F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT) in the early evaluation of abiraterone and outcome prediction in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Patient and methods: Forty-three patients with metastatic CRPC progressing after docetaxel received abiraterone 1,000 mg daily with prednisone 5 mg twice daily. Patients were evaluated monthly for serological PSA response and safety. FCH-PET/ CT was done at baseline and after 3 to 6 weeks. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models addressed potential predictors of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Declines in PSA level of ≥50% were seen in 21 of 43 (49%) patients. Forty-two patients were evaluable for FCH-PET/CT response. FCH-PET/CT bone flare was observed in 4 of 42 (10%) evaluable patients. In univariate analysis, PSA decline and FCH-PET/CT response predicted PFS, while PSA decline and FCH-PET/CT (progression vs non progression) predicted OS. In multivariate analysis, only FCH-PET/CT (progression vs nonprogression) remained significant for PFS and OS (p = 0.022 and p = 0.027, respectively). Conclusion: Early FCH-PET/CT can predict clinical outcome in CRPC beyond PSA response. These data support further studies on FCH-PET/CT for abiraterone monitoring and outcome prediction in patients with CRPC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12448-12458
Number of pages11
JournalOncotarget
Volume5
Issue number23
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • 18F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography
  • Abiraterone
  • Bone flare
  • Castration-resistant prostate cancer
  • PSA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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