Early protein intakes and adiposity: Reloaded or downloaded?

E. Riva, E. Verduci, M. Giovannini, C. Agostoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been hypothesized that feeding human milk through the first year of life may have a protective effect towards a later adiposity development, in contrast with formula feeding. The low protein content of human milk has been hypothesized as a plausible biological hypothesis. Regardless, it is often underscored that feeding human milk is associated with a higher rate of weight gain in the first two months of life. Conclusion: In our opinion, it seems that the protective effect of human milk, if any, on adiposity development is far more complex, and tightly bound to the peculiarity of human milk composition and breastfeeding practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)725-726
Number of pages2
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

Adiposity
Human Milk
Proteins
Breast Feeding
Weight Gain

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Dietary protein
  • Human milk
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Early protein intakes and adiposity : Reloaded or downloaded? / Riva, E.; Verduci, E.; Giovannini, M.; Agostoni, C.

In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Vol. 93, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 725-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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