Echocardiographic size of conductance vessels in athletes and sedentary people

P. Zeppilli, R. Vannicelli, C. Santini, A. Dello Russo, C. Picani, V. Palmieri, S. Cameli, R. Corsetti, L. Pietrangeli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to assess the size of gnat and medium caliber arterial and venous vessels (conductance vessels) in athletes of different sports and sedentary people. Vessel size was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography in 15 professional cyclists, 15 highly-trained long-distance runners, 15 professional volleyball players, 10 wheelchair basketball players, 11 wheelchair distance runners and 20 sedentary controls. The following vessels were imaged and measured: aortic arch, left carotid and left subclavian artery, right pulmonary artery, abdominal aorta and mesenteric artery, superior and inferior vena cava. Vessel size was considered in absolute value and normalized for body surface area (BSA). Among the able-bodied athletes, both cyclists and long-distance runners showed a generalized increase in vessels size in respect to controls, either absolute or normalized for BSA. The increase was highly significant for normalized inferior vena cava: cyclists, mean 15.1 mm, 95% confidence intervals 14.2 to 15.8 mm; long-distance runners, 15.8 mm, 15.3 to 16.4; controls, 10.5 mm, 9.8 to 11.3. Volleyball players also showed larger vessels than controls, but this feature was clearly related to their greater body size because statistical differences were attenuated or abolished by normalization for BSA. Wheelchair athletes exhibited significantly larger upper-body vessels but significantly smaller lower-body vessels than controls when normalized for BSA. In addition, wheelchair distance runners, who trained more intensively, had larger abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava than wheelchair basket players. Long-term endurance training leads to a generalized increase in arterial and venous conductance vessels size. The pattern observed in wheelchair athletes indicates that this process needs the integrity of vasomotor control and most likely the presence of the other training-induced changes in skeletal muscle vascularization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Wheelchairs
Athletes
Body Surface Area
Inferior Vena Cava
Volleyball
Tunica Media
Abdominal Aorta
Basketball
Mesenteric Arteries
Subclavian Artery
Superior Vena Cava
Body Size
Thoracic Aorta
Pulmonary Artery
Sports
Echocardiography
Skeletal Muscle
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Zeppilli, P., Vannicelli, R., Santini, C., Dello Russo, A., Picani, C., Palmieri, V., ... Pietrangeli, L. (1995). Echocardiographic size of conductance vessels in athletes and sedentary people. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 16(1), 38-44.

Echocardiographic size of conductance vessels in athletes and sedentary people. / Zeppilli, P.; Vannicelli, R.; Santini, C.; Dello Russo, A.; Picani, C.; Palmieri, V.; Cameli, S.; Corsetti, R.; Pietrangeli, L.

In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1995, p. 38-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeppilli, P, Vannicelli, R, Santini, C, Dello Russo, A, Picani, C, Palmieri, V, Cameli, S, Corsetti, R & Pietrangeli, L 1995, 'Echocardiographic size of conductance vessels in athletes and sedentary people', International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 38-44.
Zeppilli, P. ; Vannicelli, R. ; Santini, C. ; Dello Russo, A. ; Picani, C. ; Palmieri, V. ; Cameli, S. ; Corsetti, R. ; Pietrangeli, L. / Echocardiographic size of conductance vessels in athletes and sedentary people. In: International Journal of Sports Medicine. 1995 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 38-44.
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