EEG markers are associated to gray matter changes in thalamus and basal ganglia in subjects with mild cognitive impairment

D. V. Moretti, D. Paternicò, G. Binetti, O. Zanetti, G. B. Frisoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Gray matter (GM) changes of thalamus and basal ganglia have been demonstrated to be involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, the increase of two EEG markers, alpha3/alpha2 and theta/gamma ratio, have been associated with, respectively, AD converter and non-AD converter subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective: To study the association of prognostic EEG markers with specific GM changes of thalamus and basal ganglia in subjects with MCI to identify different MCI populations. Methods: 74 adult subjects with mild cognitive impairment underwent EEG recording and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The theta/gamma and alpha3/alpha2 ratio was computed for each subject. Three groups were obtained according to increasing tertile values of both alpha3/alpha2 and theta/gamma ratio. Gray matter density differences between groups were investigated using a voxel-based morphometry technique. Results: Subjects with higher a3/a2 ratios when compared to subjects with lower and middle a3/a2 ratios showed minor atrophy in the ventral stream of basal ganglia (head of caudate nuclei and accumbens nuclei bilaterally) and of the pulvinar nuclei in the thalamus; subjects with higher t/g ratio showed minor atrophy in putamina nuclei bilaterally than subjects with middle ratio. Conclusion: The integrated analysis of EEG and morpho-structural markers could be useful in the comprehension of anatomo-physiological underpinning of the MCI entity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-496
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroImage
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Diagnostic markers
  • EEG
  • MCI
  • MRI
  • VBM

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

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