Effect of Body Mass Index on Histopathologic Parameters: Results of Large European Contemporary Consecutive Open Radical Prostatectomy Series

Hendrik Isbarn, Claudio Jeldres, Lars Budäus, Georg Salomon, Thorsten Schlomm, Thomas Steuber, Felix K H Chun, Sascha Ahyai, Umberto Capitanio, Alexander Haese, Hans Heinzer, Hartwig Huland, Markus Graefen, Pierre Karakiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether an increased body mass index (BMI) is a predictor of advanced pathologic findings in European men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). The relationship between obesity and prostate cancer is controversial. Studies, predominantly derived from the United States, have suggested that an increased BMI is a significant predictor of adverse pathologic findings in patients treated with open RP. Methods: From April 2005 to June 2008, 1538 consecutive patients were treated with open RP at a single tertiary referral center. We tested the effect of BMI on the rate of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node invasion, and positive surgical margins in univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. The covariates consisted of clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen, biopsy Gleason score, age, prostate volume, and rate of nerve-sparing surgery. Results: On multivariate analysis, both continuously coded and categorically coded BMI was unrelated to the rate of extracapsular extension (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, P = .5), seminal vesicle invasion (OR 1.03, P = .3), lymph node invasion (OR 0.98, P = .7), or positive surgical margins (OR 1.03, P = .3). Conclusions: Obese patients who are candidates for open RP should not expect to have worse pathologic findings after surgery than their nonobese counterparts. Differences in patients' weight and height between North America and Europe might explain the lack of adverse effects of an elevated BMI in this European cohort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-619
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume73
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

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Prostatectomy
Body Mass Index
Odds Ratio
Seminal Vesicles
Logistic Models
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Grading
Prostate-Specific Antigen
North America
Tertiary Care Centers
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity
Biopsy
Weights and Measures
Margins of Excision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Effect of Body Mass Index on Histopathologic Parameters : Results of Large European Contemporary Consecutive Open Radical Prostatectomy Series. / Isbarn, Hendrik; Jeldres, Claudio; Budäus, Lars; Salomon, Georg; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steuber, Thomas; Chun, Felix K H; Ahyai, Sascha; Capitanio, Umberto; Haese, Alexander; Heinzer, Hans; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Karakiewicz, Pierre.

In: Urology, Vol. 73, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 615-619.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Isbarn, H, Jeldres, C, Budäus, L, Salomon, G, Schlomm, T, Steuber, T, Chun, FKH, Ahyai, S, Capitanio, U, Haese, A, Heinzer, H, Huland, H, Graefen, M & Karakiewicz, P 2009, 'Effect of Body Mass Index on Histopathologic Parameters: Results of Large European Contemporary Consecutive Open Radical Prostatectomy Series', Urology, vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 615-619. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2008.09.038
Isbarn, Hendrik ; Jeldres, Claudio ; Budäus, Lars ; Salomon, Georg ; Schlomm, Thorsten ; Steuber, Thomas ; Chun, Felix K H ; Ahyai, Sascha ; Capitanio, Umberto ; Haese, Alexander ; Heinzer, Hans ; Huland, Hartwig ; Graefen, Markus ; Karakiewicz, Pierre. / Effect of Body Mass Index on Histopathologic Parameters : Results of Large European Contemporary Consecutive Open Radical Prostatectomy Series. In: Urology. 2009 ; Vol. 73, No. 3. pp. 615-619.
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AU - Salomon, Georg

AU - Schlomm, Thorsten

AU - Steuber, Thomas

AU - Chun, Felix K H

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