Effect of Chemically Induced Hypoxia on Osteogenic and Angiogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells in Direct Coculture

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Abstract

Bone is an active tissue where bone mineralization and resorption occur simultaneously. In the case of fracture, there are numerous factors required to facilitate bone healing including precursor cells and blood vessels. To evaluate the interaction between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC)-the precursor cells able to differentiate into bone-forming cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-a cell source widely used for the study of blood vessels. We performed direct coculture of BMSC and HUVEC in normoxia and chemically induced hypoxia using Cobalt(II) chloride and Dimethyloxaloylglycine and in the condition where oxygen level was maintained at 1% as well. Cell proliferation was analyzed by crystal violet staining. Osteogenesis was examined by Alizarin Red and Collagen type I staining. Expression of angiogenic factor-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial marker-von Willebrand factor (VWF) were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction was also used to evaluate gene expression. The results showed that coculture in normoxia could retain both osteogenic differentiation and endothelial markers while hypoxic condition limits cell proliferation and osteogenesis but favors the angiogenic function even after 1 of day treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCells
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 19 2020

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