Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people

Antonino Mulè, Letizia Galasso, Lucia Castelli, Vincenzo Condemi, Angela Valentina Bisconti, Fabio Esposito, Eliana Roveda, Angela Montaruli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, heart rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). Methods: The Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to determine the chronotype’s students of the School of Exercise Sciences, University of Milan. To investigate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, HR and RPE, 22 participants (11 M-types, 11 E-types) performed the Cooper test at 9:00 a.m. and at 5:00 p.m. Before and after the Cooper test, the RPE was detected using the Borg Scale CR 0–10. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed an interaction between chronotype, time span and RPE. Specifically, M-types perceived less effort in the morning compared to the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 2.5 ± 1.3) and after exercise (CR-10: 7.4 ± 1 vs 8.6 ± 1). E-types felt more fatigued in the morning than in the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 1.1 ± 1.1) and after exercise (CR-10: 8.4 ± 0.6 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Moreover, in the morning session, E-types had a greater perception of the effort (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 8.4 ± 0.6) than M-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 7.4 ± 1). Instead, in the afternoon session, M-types showed higher RPE values (CR-10: 2.5 ± 1.3 vs 8.6 ± 1) than E-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 1.1 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Cooper Test and HR results did not show statistically significant differences. On the other hand, no interaction was found between chronotype, day time and performance or HR. Conclusions: M-types perceive higher effort in the afternoon session; by contrast, E-types show an opposite trend and are more fatigued in the morning session. These findings may be useful to the coach to plane tailored training programs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSport Sciences for Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Chronotype
  • Cooper test
  • Physical performance
  • Rating of perceived exertion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Mulè, A., Galasso, L., Castelli, L., Condemi, V., Bisconti, A. V., Esposito, F., ... Montaruli, A. (Accepted/In press). Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people. Sport Sciences for Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-019-00610-9

Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people. / Mulè, Antonino; Galasso, Letizia; Castelli, Lucia; Condemi, Vincenzo; Bisconti, Angela Valentina; Esposito, Fabio; Roveda, Eliana; Montaruli, Angela.

In: Sport Sciences for Health, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mulè, A, Galasso, L, Castelli, L, Condemi, V, Bisconti, AV, Esposito, F, Roveda, E & Montaruli, A 2019, 'Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people', Sport Sciences for Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11332-019-00610-9
Mulè, Antonino ; Galasso, Letizia ; Castelli, Lucia ; Condemi, Vincenzo ; Bisconti, Angela Valentina ; Esposito, Fabio ; Roveda, Eliana ; Montaruli, Angela. / Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people. In: Sport Sciences for Health. 2019.
@article{58823c5a5dc14b1a93f95bb438b43f92,
title = "Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people",
abstract = "Purpose: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, heart rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). Methods: The Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to determine the chronotype’s students of the School of Exercise Sciences, University of Milan. To investigate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, HR and RPE, 22 participants (11 M-types, 11 E-types) performed the Cooper test at 9:00 a.m. and at 5:00 p.m. Before and after the Cooper test, the RPE was detected using the Borg Scale CR 0–10. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed an interaction between chronotype, time span and RPE. Specifically, M-types perceived less effort in the morning compared to the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 2.5 ± 1.3) and after exercise (CR-10: 7.4 ± 1 vs 8.6 ± 1). E-types felt more fatigued in the morning than in the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 1.1 ± 1.1) and after exercise (CR-10: 8.4 ± 0.6 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Moreover, in the morning session, E-types had a greater perception of the effort (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 8.4 ± 0.6) than M-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 7.4 ± 1). Instead, in the afternoon session, M-types showed higher RPE values (CR-10: 2.5 ± 1.3 vs 8.6 ± 1) than E-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 1.1 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Cooper Test and HR results did not show statistically significant differences. On the other hand, no interaction was found between chronotype, day time and performance or HR. Conclusions: M-types perceive higher effort in the afternoon session; by contrast, E-types show an opposite trend and are more fatigued in the morning session. These findings may be useful to the coach to plane tailored training programs.",
keywords = "Chronotype, Cooper test, Physical performance, Rating of perceived exertion",
author = "Antonino Mul{\`e} and Letizia Galasso and Lucia Castelli and Vincenzo Condemi and Bisconti, {Angela Valentina} and Fabio Esposito and Eliana Roveda and Angela Montaruli",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11332-019-00610-9",
language = "English",
journal = "Sport Sciences for Health",
issn = "1824-7490",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag Italia",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of chronotype on rating of perceived exertion in active young people

AU - Mulè, Antonino

AU - Galasso, Letizia

AU - Castelli, Lucia

AU - Condemi, Vincenzo

AU - Bisconti, Angela Valentina

AU - Esposito, Fabio

AU - Roveda, Eliana

AU - Montaruli, Angela

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Purpose: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, heart rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). Methods: The Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to determine the chronotype’s students of the School of Exercise Sciences, University of Milan. To investigate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, HR and RPE, 22 participants (11 M-types, 11 E-types) performed the Cooper test at 9:00 a.m. and at 5:00 p.m. Before and after the Cooper test, the RPE was detected using the Borg Scale CR 0–10. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed an interaction between chronotype, time span and RPE. Specifically, M-types perceived less effort in the morning compared to the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 2.5 ± 1.3) and after exercise (CR-10: 7.4 ± 1 vs 8.6 ± 1). E-types felt more fatigued in the morning than in the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 1.1 ± 1.1) and after exercise (CR-10: 8.4 ± 0.6 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Moreover, in the morning session, E-types had a greater perception of the effort (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 8.4 ± 0.6) than M-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 7.4 ± 1). Instead, in the afternoon session, M-types showed higher RPE values (CR-10: 2.5 ± 1.3 vs 8.6 ± 1) than E-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 1.1 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Cooper Test and HR results did not show statistically significant differences. On the other hand, no interaction was found between chronotype, day time and performance or HR. Conclusions: M-types perceive higher effort in the afternoon session; by contrast, E-types show an opposite trend and are more fatigued in the morning session. These findings may be useful to the coach to plane tailored training programs.

AB - Purpose: The study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, heart rate (HR) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE). Methods: The Morningness–Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) was administered to determine the chronotype’s students of the School of Exercise Sciences, University of Milan. To investigate the effect of chronotype on aerobic performance, HR and RPE, 22 participants (11 M-types, 11 E-types) performed the Cooper test at 9:00 a.m. and at 5:00 p.m. Before and after the Cooper test, the RPE was detected using the Borg Scale CR 0–10. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed an interaction between chronotype, time span and RPE. Specifically, M-types perceived less effort in the morning compared to the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 2.5 ± 1.3) and after exercise (CR-10: 7.4 ± 1 vs 8.6 ± 1). E-types felt more fatigued in the morning than in the afternoon session (p < 0.05), both before (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 1.1 ± 1.1) and after exercise (CR-10: 8.4 ± 0.6 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Moreover, in the morning session, E-types had a greater perception of the effort (CR-10: 2.4 ± 1.4 vs 8.4 ± 0.6) than M-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 0.8 vs 7.4 ± 1). Instead, in the afternoon session, M-types showed higher RPE values (CR-10: 2.5 ± 1.3 vs 8.6 ± 1) than E-types (CR-10: 1.1 ± 1.1 vs 7.5 ± 0.7). Cooper Test and HR results did not show statistically significant differences. On the other hand, no interaction was found between chronotype, day time and performance or HR. Conclusions: M-types perceive higher effort in the afternoon session; by contrast, E-types show an opposite trend and are more fatigued in the morning session. These findings may be useful to the coach to plane tailored training programs.

KW - Chronotype

KW - Cooper test

KW - Physical performance

KW - Rating of perceived exertion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076193510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85076193510&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11332-019-00610-9

DO - 10.1007/s11332-019-00610-9

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85076193510

JO - Sport Sciences for Health

JF - Sport Sciences for Health

SN - 1824-7490

ER -