Effect of diet on serum albumin and hemoglobin adducts of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) in humans

Cinzia Magagnott, Federica Orsi, Renzo Bagnati, Nicola Celli, Domenico Rotilio, Roberto Fanelli, Luisa Airoldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is the most abundant heterocyclic amine formed in meat and fish during cooking and can be used as a model compound for this class of chemicals possibly involved in human carcinogenesis. Knowing the exposure to heterocyclic amines is important for establishing their role in human diseases. Serum albumin (SA) and globin (Gb) adducts were first tested as biomarkers of exposure to PhIP in male Fischer 344 rats given oral doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 10 mg/kg. Blood samples were collected 24 hr after treatment and PhIP released from SA and Gb after acidic hydrolysis was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry. PhIP-SA and Gb adducts increased linearly with the dose. Studies on 35 volunteers with different dietary habits exhibited that diet was a major determinant in the formation of both adducts. PhIP-SA adducts were significantly higher in meat consumers than in vegetarians (6.7 ± 1.6 and 0.7 ± 0.3 fmol/mg SA; respectively, mean ± SE; p = 0.04, Mann-Whitney U test). The Gb adduct pattern was quantitatively lower but paralleled SA (3 ± 0.8 in meat consumers and 0.3 ± 0.1 in vegetarians). PhIP-SA adducts were no different in smokers and in non-smokers. The results show for the first time that PhIP-blood protein adducts are present in humans not given the synthetic compound. Both biomarkers appear to be suitable for assessing dietary exposure and internal PhIP dose and may be promising tools for studying the role of heterocyclic amines in the etiology of colon cancer and other diseases. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Serum Albumin
Hemoglobins
Diet
Globins
Meat
Amines
Biomarkers
2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine
Inbred F344 Rats
Cooking
Feeding Behavior
Nonparametric Statistics
Colonic Neoplasms
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Blood Proteins
Volunteers
Mass Spectrometry
Carcinogenesis
Fishes
Hydrolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Effect of diet on serum albumin and hemoglobin adducts of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) in humans. / Magagnott, Cinzia; Orsi, Federica; Bagnati, Renzo; Celli, Nicola; Rotilio, Domenico; Fanelli, Roberto; Airoldi, Luisa.

In: International Journal of Cancer, Vol. 88, No. 1, 2000, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Magagnott, Cinzia ; Orsi, Federica ; Bagnati, Renzo ; Celli, Nicola ; Rotilio, Domenico ; Fanelli, Roberto ; Airoldi, Luisa. / Effect of diet on serum albumin and hemoglobin adducts of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) in humans. In: International Journal of Cancer. 2000 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 1-6.
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T1 - Effect of diet on serum albumin and hemoglobin adducts of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhlP) in humans

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AU - Celli, Nicola

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AU - Airoldi, Luisa

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