Effect of high-altitude trekking on blood pressure and on asymmetric dimethylarginine and isoprostane production: Results from a Mount Ararat expedition

Vittore Verratti, Claudio Ferrante, Davide Soranna, Antonella Zambon, Suwas Bhandari, Giustino Orlando, Luigi Brunetti, Gianfranco Parati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study aimed at exploring the mechanisms behind blood pressure and heart rate changes upon acute altitude exposure utilizing urinary excretion of biochemical factors involved in cardiovascular regulation. The study was conducted on 12 lowlander native male mountain climbers, living at sea level, exposed to altitudes ranging from 1800 to 5147 m above sea level over 4 days, during their ascent to Mount Ararat (Turkey). Blood pressure (measured by oscillometric method), heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at rest (on awakening before food intake), in hypoxic conditions at 4200 m and at sea level before and after the altitude expedition. In the same study conditions (ie before-during-after the expedition), first-voided urinary samples were collected and assayed for 8-iso-prostaglandin F (8-iso-PGF) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) determination. Heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher (P <.05) at high altitude than at the sea level. Furthermore, both urinary 8-iso-PGF and ADMA were significantly elevated (P <.01) at high altitude and returned to normal levels soon after returning to sea level. A 4-day exposure to high-altitude hypoxia induced a temporary increase in blood pressure and heart rate, confirming previous findings. Blood pressure increase at high altitude was associated with significantly enhanced production of biochemical mediators such as 8-iso-PGF2α, catecholamines, and ADMA, although we could not demonstrate a direct link between these parallel significant changes probably due to the forcefully limited sample size of our study, carried out in challenging environmental conditions at very high altitude.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1494-1503
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • 8-iso-PGF
  • ADMA
  • altitude
  • blood pressure
  • hypoxia
  • sympathetic nervous system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of high-altitude trekking on blood pressure and on asymmetric dimethylarginine and isoprostane production: Results from a Mount Ararat expedition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this