Effect of pregabalin add-on treatment on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy: A pilot study

Marta Maschio, Loredana Dinapoli, Francesca Sperati, Andrea Pace, Alessandra Fabi, Antonello Vidiri, Alfredo Pompili, Carmine Maria Carapella

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17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: An open pilot study to evaluate the effect of pregabalin (PGB) as add-on therapy on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy (BTRE). Materials and methods: We recruited 25 consecutive patients with BTRE and uncontrolled seizures. At baseline and during follow-up, patients underwent a complete physical and neurological examination and were evaluated using the QOLIE 31P (V2), EORTC QLQ C30, Adverse Events Profile, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). At baseline, a seizure diary was given. Results: During follow-up, 17 patients underwent chemotherapy, none underwent radiotherapy, 9 had disease progression, and 3 died. Mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 months. Mean PGB dos age was 279mg/day. Atbaseline, mean weekly seizure frequency was 5.3 (±10) and at last available follow-up visit was 2.8±5. This difference was statistically significant (p=0.016). The responder rate was 76%. Ten patients dropped out;4 as a result of seizure worsening, 1 as a result of unchanged seizure frequency, 3 as a result of a lack of compliance, and 2 as a result of side effects. Based on the QOLIE-31-P, a significant improvement of the sub scale "seizure worry" (p=0.004) and a significant decrease in distress scores related to AEDs and social life (p=0.009 and p=0.008, respectively) were observed. A significant decrease in HAM-A score (p=0.002) was documented. Conclusions: These data indicate that PGB may represent a valid alternative as add-on treatment in this patient population, based on its efficacy on seizure control and anxiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)388-397
Number of pages10
JournalEpileptic Disorders
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Brain Neoplasms
Epilepsy
Seizures
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Pregabalin
Neurologic Examination
Compliance
Physical Examination
Disease Progression
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy
Population

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Brain tumor
  • Efficacy
  • Epilepsy
  • Pregabalin
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

@article{37346759017243d5a3e3b91668f63da8,
title = "Effect of pregabalin add-on treatment on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy: A pilot study",
abstract = "Objective: An open pilot study to evaluate the effect of pregabalin (PGB) as add-on therapy on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy (BTRE). Materials and methods: We recruited 25 consecutive patients with BTRE and uncontrolled seizures. At baseline and during follow-up, patients underwent a complete physical and neurological examination and were evaluated using the QOLIE 31P (V2), EORTC QLQ C30, Adverse Events Profile, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). At baseline, a seizure diary was given. Results: During follow-up, 17 patients underwent chemotherapy, none underwent radiotherapy, 9 had disease progression, and 3 died. Mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 months. Mean PGB dos age was 279mg/day. Atbaseline, mean weekly seizure frequency was 5.3 (±10) and at last available follow-up visit was 2.8±5. This difference was statistically significant (p=0.016). The responder rate was 76{\%}. Ten patients dropped out;4 as a result of seizure worsening, 1 as a result of unchanged seizure frequency, 3 as a result of a lack of compliance, and 2 as a result of side effects. Based on the QOLIE-31-P, a significant improvement of the sub scale {"}seizure worry{"} (p=0.004) and a significant decrease in distress scores related to AEDs and social life (p=0.009 and p=0.008, respectively) were observed. A significant decrease in HAM-A score (p=0.002) was documented. Conclusions: These data indicate that PGB may represent a valid alternative as add-on treatment in this patient population, based on its efficacy on seizure control and anxiety.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Brain tumor, Efficacy, Epilepsy, Pregabalin, Quality of life",
author = "Marta Maschio and Loredana Dinapoli and Francesca Sperati and Andrea Pace and Alessandra Fabi and Antonello Vidiri and Alfredo Pompili and Carapella, {Carmine Maria}",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1684/epd.2012.0542",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "388--397",
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T1 - Effect of pregabalin add-on treatment on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy

T2 - A pilot study

AU - Maschio, Marta

AU - Dinapoli, Loredana

AU - Sperati, Francesca

AU - Pace, Andrea

AU - Fabi, Alessandra

AU - Vidiri, Antonello

AU - Pompili, Alfredo

AU - Carapella, Carmine Maria

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - Objective: An open pilot study to evaluate the effect of pregabalin (PGB) as add-on therapy on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy (BTRE). Materials and methods: We recruited 25 consecutive patients with BTRE and uncontrolled seizures. At baseline and during follow-up, patients underwent a complete physical and neurological examination and were evaluated using the QOLIE 31P (V2), EORTC QLQ C30, Adverse Events Profile, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). At baseline, a seizure diary was given. Results: During follow-up, 17 patients underwent chemotherapy, none underwent radiotherapy, 9 had disease progression, and 3 died. Mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 months. Mean PGB dos age was 279mg/day. Atbaseline, mean weekly seizure frequency was 5.3 (±10) and at last available follow-up visit was 2.8±5. This difference was statistically significant (p=0.016). The responder rate was 76%. Ten patients dropped out;4 as a result of seizure worsening, 1 as a result of unchanged seizure frequency, 3 as a result of a lack of compliance, and 2 as a result of side effects. Based on the QOLIE-31-P, a significant improvement of the sub scale "seizure worry" (p=0.004) and a significant decrease in distress scores related to AEDs and social life (p=0.009 and p=0.008, respectively) were observed. A significant decrease in HAM-A score (p=0.002) was documented. Conclusions: These data indicate that PGB may represent a valid alternative as add-on treatment in this patient population, based on its efficacy on seizure control and anxiety.

AB - Objective: An open pilot study to evaluate the effect of pregabalin (PGB) as add-on therapy on seizure control, quality of life, and anxiety in patients with brain tumour-related epilepsy (BTRE). Materials and methods: We recruited 25 consecutive patients with BTRE and uncontrolled seizures. At baseline and during follow-up, patients underwent a complete physical and neurological examination and were evaluated using the QOLIE 31P (V2), EORTC QLQ C30, Adverse Events Profile, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). At baseline, a seizure diary was given. Results: During follow-up, 17 patients underwent chemotherapy, none underwent radiotherapy, 9 had disease progression, and 3 died. Mean duration of follow-up was 4.1 months. Mean PGB dos age was 279mg/day. Atbaseline, mean weekly seizure frequency was 5.3 (±10) and at last available follow-up visit was 2.8±5. This difference was statistically significant (p=0.016). The responder rate was 76%. Ten patients dropped out;4 as a result of seizure worsening, 1 as a result of unchanged seizure frequency, 3 as a result of a lack of compliance, and 2 as a result of side effects. Based on the QOLIE-31-P, a significant improvement of the sub scale "seizure worry" (p=0.004) and a significant decrease in distress scores related to AEDs and social life (p=0.009 and p=0.008, respectively) were observed. A significant decrease in HAM-A score (p=0.002) was documented. Conclusions: These data indicate that PGB may represent a valid alternative as add-on treatment in this patient population, based on its efficacy on seizure control and anxiety.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Brain tumor

KW - Efficacy

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Pregabalin

KW - Quality of life

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