Effect of prolonged administration of low doses of dietary retinoids on cell-mediated immunity and the growth of transplantable tumors in mice

G. Forni, S. Cerruti Sola, M. Giovarelli, A. Santoni, P. Martinetto, D. Vietti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A study was conducted on the activity exerted by prolonged dietary supplementation with progressive amounts of retinoids on cell-mediated immune response and the growth of transplantable tumors in mice. A few groups of BALB/c mice received 0 (group C), 50 (group A 50), 200 (group A 200), 500 (group A 500), and 1,000 (group A 1000) IU retinol palmitate/mouse/day in drinking water for 150 days. At progressive intervals mice from each group were tested for proliferative responses to concanavalin A (Con A), Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-2, and interferon-γ release to Con A. Ten mice from each group were also challenged with the 90-100% tumor-inducing dose of 3 distinct transplantable tumors. At the end of the experiment the principal organs were histologically examined, and the accumulation of vitamin A was evaluated. In groups A 200, A 500, and A 1000, an increase in the proliferative responses and production of lymphokines as compared to those in group C occurred after 60-90 days, but vanished after 150 days. The takes of the 3 tumors were impaired when the challenges were performed on days 75 and 150. This enhancement of distinct functions of cellular reactivity and resistance to transplantable tumors showed a linear relationship with the amount of supplemental retinol palmitate for the first 60-90 days. After 150 days, however, these enhancement effects vanished or tended to decrease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume76
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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