Effectiveness of esophageal manometry in predicting the outcome of children with primary GER after floppy Nissen-Rossetti wrap

G. Mattioli, V. Gentilino, E. Caponcelli, F. Martino, M. Castagnetti, A. PiniPrato, V. Jasonni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can result in many postoperative problems because of an incorrect indication or an unsuitable fundoplication. Many preoperative tests have been suggested to perform a "tailored fundoplication," but there is no clear evidence as to which is the best. The aim of our study was to define the effectiveness of esophageal manometry in predicting the outcome of children who need fundoplication because of refractory primary gastroesophageal reflux. Methods: Thirty-two children were included in the study. Patients with gastroenterologic and respiratory symptoms numbered 10 (31%) and 22 (69%), respectively. The preoperative motility pattern was (1) inappropriate relaxations alone in nine patients (28%) and associated with esophageal body dysmotility in one patients (3%); (2) low-pressure lower esophageal sphincter (LES), alone in 13 patients (41%) and associated with body dysmotility in eight (25%). Motility pattern of the esophageal body was abnormal in nine children. Manometric anomalies were absent only in one case. Results: Low pressure of the LES associated with atypical esophageal motility disorders was significantly higher in the gastroenterological group and in the older patients. Low pressure of the LES associated with good esophageal activity was significantly higher in the respiratory group and in the patients younger than 24 months. There was no correlation between motility pattern and outcome, and no statistically significant differences were found between pressure values at the different levels and symptoms, outcome, and age groups. Conclusions: Esophageal manometry is not mandatory to predict the outcome of patients undergoing laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication for refractory primary GER treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1504-1508
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2004

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Manometry
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Fundoplication
Lower Esophageal Sphincter
Esophageal Motility Disorders
Pressure
Age Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Children
  • Fundoplication
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux
  • Manometry
  • Reflux

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effectiveness of esophageal manometry in predicting the outcome of children with primary GER after floppy Nissen-Rossetti wrap. / Mattioli, G.; Gentilino, V.; Caponcelli, E.; Martino, F.; Castagnetti, M.; PiniPrato, A.; Jasonni, V.

In: Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques, Vol. 18, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 1504-1508.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - PiniPrato, A.

AU - Jasonni, V.

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