Effects of a residential exercise training on baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability in patients with coronary artery disease: A randomized, controlled study

Ferdinando Iellamo, Jacopo M. Legramante, Michele Massaro, Gianfranco Raimondi, Alberto Galante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background - Myocardial ischemia and infarction impair baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), which when depressed is predictive of future cardiac events after myocardial infarction (MI). The main objective of this study was to determine whether exercise training improves BRS in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods and Results - Ninety-seven male patients with and without a previous MI were recruited after myocardial revascularization surgery and randomized into trained (TR) or untrained (UTR) groups. TR patients underwent a residential exercise program at 85% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) consisting of 2 daily sessions 6 times a week for 2 weeks. Eighty-six patients (45 TR and 41 UTR) completed the study. BRS was assessed at baseline and at the end of the protocol by the spontaneous baroreflex method. The standard deviation of mean R-R interval (RRSD) was also assessed as a measure of heart rate variability. At baseline, there were no significant differences between TR and UTR patients in any variable. In TR patients, BRS increased from 3.0±0.3 to 5.3±0.7 ms/mm Hg (P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2588-2592
Number of pages5
JournalCirculation
Volume102
Issue number21
Publication statusPublished - Nov 21 2000

Keywords

  • Coronary disease
  • Exercise
  • Heart rate
  • Reflex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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