Effects of a restricted sleep regimen on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in normotensive subjects

Paola Lusardi, A. Mugellini, P. Preti, A. Zoppi, G. Derosa, R. Fogari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of sleep deprivation during the first part of the night on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was studied in 18 normotensive subjects. They underwent two ABPM, one week apart: during the first, they slept from 11 PM to 7 AM, and during the second, from 2 AM to 7 AM. The main differences were observed at dawn, before awakening, when SBP and DBP significantly decreased (P <.01) in the restricted sleep regimen, and during the morning after the recovery sleep, when SBP and HR significantly increased (P <.05). The explanation for these findings is not obvious. We suppose that the decrease in SBP and DBP at dawn might be due to a reorganization of the sleep phases in the restricted sleep regimen, whereas the increase in SBP and HR after awakening might be due to a greater sympathetic activation, as though sleep deprivation was a stressful condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-505
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1996

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Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Sleep
Sleep Deprivation

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of a restricted sleep regimen on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in normotensive subjects. / Lusardi, Paola; Mugellini, A.; Preti, P.; Zoppi, A.; Derosa, G.; Fogari, R.

In: American Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 9, No. 5, 05.1996, p. 503-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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