Effects of blood volume restitution following a portal hypertensive-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats

B. Castañeda, J. Morales, R. Lionetti, E. Moitinho, V. Andreu, S. Pérez-del-Pulgar, P. Pizcueta, J. Rodés, J. Bosch

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different strategies of blood volume restitution in the outcome of portal hypertension-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage was induced by sectioning a first order branch of the ileocolic vein in 38 cirrhotic rats (common bile duct ligation and occlusion). The subsequent hypovolemic shock was treated with no transfusion (n = 17), moderate transfusion (50% of expected blood loss, 5 mL, n = 11), and total transfusion (100% of expected blood loss, 10 mL, n = 10). At the end of the blood transfusion period (minute 15), mean arterial pressure (MAP) partially recovered in rats receiving moderate transfusion or no transfusion but decreased in the 10-mL transfusion group (↓ 12 ± 43%, P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). After transfusion, groups given no or 5 mL transfusion remained hemodynamically stable. However, rats receiving 10 mL transfusion continued to deteriorate with persistent bleeding and progressive fall in MAP (↓ 65 ± 12%; P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). Collected blood loss was significantly greater in the 10-mL group (20.0 ± 1.5 g) than in groups given 5 mL (15.9 ± 2.8 g; P <.05) or no transfusion (13.2 ± 2.1 g; P <.05 vs. 10 mL and 5 mL transfusion). Survival in the no transfusion group was 47%. Rats given 5-mL transfusion had 64% survival. The worst survival was observed in the 10-mL transfusion group (0% survival; P <.05). We concluded that a transfusion policy aimed at completely replacing blood loss worsens the magnitude of bleeding and mortality from portal hypertensive-related bleeding in cirrhotic rats. On the contrary, moderate blood transfusion allowed hemodynamic stabilization and increased survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)821-825
Number of pages5
JournalHepatology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Blood Volume
Hemorrhage
Blood Transfusion
Arterial Pressure
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage
Common Bile Duct
Portal Hypertension
Ligation
Veins
Shock
Hemodynamics
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Castañeda, B., Morales, J., Lionetti, R., Moitinho, E., Andreu, V., Pérez-del-Pulgar, S., ... Bosch, J. (2001). Effects of blood volume restitution following a portal hypertensive-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. Hepatology, 33(4), 821-825. https://doi.org/10.1053/jhep.2001.23437

Effects of blood volume restitution following a portal hypertensive-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. / Castañeda, B.; Morales, J.; Lionetti, R.; Moitinho, E.; Andreu, V.; Pérez-del-Pulgar, S.; Pizcueta, P.; Rodés, J.; Bosch, J.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 2001, p. 821-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castañeda, B, Morales, J, Lionetti, R, Moitinho, E, Andreu, V, Pérez-del-Pulgar, S, Pizcueta, P, Rodés, J & Bosch, J 2001, 'Effects of blood volume restitution following a portal hypertensive-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats', Hepatology, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 821-825. https://doi.org/10.1053/jhep.2001.23437
Castañeda, B. ; Morales, J. ; Lionetti, R. ; Moitinho, E. ; Andreu, V. ; Pérez-del-Pulgar, S. ; Pizcueta, P. ; Rodés, J. ; Bosch, J. / Effects of blood volume restitution following a portal hypertensive-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. In: Hepatology. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 821-825.
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abstract = "The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different strategies of blood volume restitution in the outcome of portal hypertension-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage was induced by sectioning a first order branch of the ileocolic vein in 38 cirrhotic rats (common bile duct ligation and occlusion). The subsequent hypovolemic shock was treated with no transfusion (n = 17), moderate transfusion (50{\%} of expected blood loss, 5 mL, n = 11), and total transfusion (100{\%} of expected blood loss, 10 mL, n = 10). At the end of the blood transfusion period (minute 15), mean arterial pressure (MAP) partially recovered in rats receiving moderate transfusion or no transfusion but decreased in the 10-mL transfusion group (↓ 12 ± 43{\%}, P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). After transfusion, groups given no or 5 mL transfusion remained hemodynamically stable. However, rats receiving 10 mL transfusion continued to deteriorate with persistent bleeding and progressive fall in MAP (↓ 65 ± 12{\%}; P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). Collected blood loss was significantly greater in the 10-mL group (20.0 ± 1.5 g) than in groups given 5 mL (15.9 ± 2.8 g; P <.05) or no transfusion (13.2 ± 2.1 g; P <.05 vs. 10 mL and 5 mL transfusion). Survival in the no transfusion group was 47{\%}. Rats given 5-mL transfusion had 64{\%} survival. The worst survival was observed in the 10-mL transfusion group (0{\%} survival; P <.05). We concluded that a transfusion policy aimed at completely replacing blood loss worsens the magnitude of bleeding and mortality from portal hypertensive-related bleeding in cirrhotic rats. On the contrary, moderate blood transfusion allowed hemodynamic stabilization and increased survival.",
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AU - Morales, J.

AU - Lionetti, R.

AU - Moitinho, E.

AU - Andreu, V.

AU - Pérez-del-Pulgar, S.

AU - Pizcueta, P.

AU - Rodés, J.

AU - Bosch, J.

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N2 - The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different strategies of blood volume restitution in the outcome of portal hypertension-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage was induced by sectioning a first order branch of the ileocolic vein in 38 cirrhotic rats (common bile duct ligation and occlusion). The subsequent hypovolemic shock was treated with no transfusion (n = 17), moderate transfusion (50% of expected blood loss, 5 mL, n = 11), and total transfusion (100% of expected blood loss, 10 mL, n = 10). At the end of the blood transfusion period (minute 15), mean arterial pressure (MAP) partially recovered in rats receiving moderate transfusion or no transfusion but decreased in the 10-mL transfusion group (↓ 12 ± 43%, P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). After transfusion, groups given no or 5 mL transfusion remained hemodynamically stable. However, rats receiving 10 mL transfusion continued to deteriorate with persistent bleeding and progressive fall in MAP (↓ 65 ± 12%; P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). Collected blood loss was significantly greater in the 10-mL group (20.0 ± 1.5 g) than in groups given 5 mL (15.9 ± 2.8 g; P <.05) or no transfusion (13.2 ± 2.1 g; P <.05 vs. 10 mL and 5 mL transfusion). Survival in the no transfusion group was 47%. Rats given 5-mL transfusion had 64% survival. The worst survival was observed in the 10-mL transfusion group (0% survival; P <.05). We concluded that a transfusion policy aimed at completely replacing blood loss worsens the magnitude of bleeding and mortality from portal hypertensive-related bleeding in cirrhotic rats. On the contrary, moderate blood transfusion allowed hemodynamic stabilization and increased survival.

AB - The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different strategies of blood volume restitution in the outcome of portal hypertension-related bleeding in anesthetized cirrhotic rats. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage was induced by sectioning a first order branch of the ileocolic vein in 38 cirrhotic rats (common bile duct ligation and occlusion). The subsequent hypovolemic shock was treated with no transfusion (n = 17), moderate transfusion (50% of expected blood loss, 5 mL, n = 11), and total transfusion (100% of expected blood loss, 10 mL, n = 10). At the end of the blood transfusion period (minute 15), mean arterial pressure (MAP) partially recovered in rats receiving moderate transfusion or no transfusion but decreased in the 10-mL transfusion group (↓ 12 ± 43%, P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). After transfusion, groups given no or 5 mL transfusion remained hemodynamically stable. However, rats receiving 10 mL transfusion continued to deteriorate with persistent bleeding and progressive fall in MAP (↓ 65 ± 12%; P <.05 vs. no transfusion and 5 mL transfusion). Collected blood loss was significantly greater in the 10-mL group (20.0 ± 1.5 g) than in groups given 5 mL (15.9 ± 2.8 g; P <.05) or no transfusion (13.2 ± 2.1 g; P <.05 vs. 10 mL and 5 mL transfusion). Survival in the no transfusion group was 47%. Rats given 5-mL transfusion had 64% survival. The worst survival was observed in the 10-mL transfusion group (0% survival; P <.05). We concluded that a transfusion policy aimed at completely replacing blood loss worsens the magnitude of bleeding and mortality from portal hypertensive-related bleeding in cirrhotic rats. On the contrary, moderate blood transfusion allowed hemodynamic stabilization and increased survival.

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