Effects of carbonated water on functional dyspepsia and constipation

Rosario Cuomo, Raffella Grasso, Giovanni Sarnelli, Gaetano Capuano, Emanuele Nicolai, Gerardo Nardone, Domenico Pomponi, Gabriele Budillon, Enzo Ierardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: The effects of carbonated beverages on the gastrointestinal tract have been poorly investigated. Therefore, this study aims to assess the effect of carbonated water intake in patients with functional dyspepsia and constipation. Methods: Twenty-one patients with dyspepsia and secondary constipation were randomized into two groups in a double-blind fashion. One group (10 subjects) drank carbonated water and the other (11 subjects) tap water for almost 15 days. Patients were evaluated for dyspepsia and constipation scores, and underwent a satiety test by a liquid meal, radionuclide gastric emptying, sonographic gallbladder emptying and colonic transit time, using radio-opaque markers. Results: The dyspepsia score was significantly reduced with carbonated water (before = 7.9 ± 2.8 vs after = 5.4 ± 1.7; P <0.05) and remained unmodified after tap water (9.7 ± 5.3 vs 9.9 ± 4.0). The constipation score also decreased significantly (P <0.05) after carbonated water (16.0 ± 3.9 vs 12.1 ± 4.4; P <0.05) and was not significantly different with tap water (14.7 ± 5.1 vs 13.7 ± 4.7). Satiety was significantly reduced with carbonated water (before = 447 ± 146 kcal vs after = 590 ± 245; P <0.01). Gallbladder emptying (delta percent contraction) was significantly improved only with carbonated water (39.9 ± 16.1% vs 53.6 ± 16.7%; P <0.01). Conclusion: In patients complaining of functional dyspepsia and constipation, carbonated water decreases satiety and improves dyspepsia, constipation and gallbladder emptying.

LanguageEnglish
Pages991-999
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Carbonated Water
Dyspepsia
Constipation
Gallbladder Emptying
Water
Carbonated Beverages
Gastric Emptying
Radioisotopes
Drinking
Meals
Gastrointestinal Tract

Keywords

  • Carbonated water
  • Colonic transit time
  • Constipation
  • Dyspepsia
  • Gallbladder emptying
  • Gastric emptying
  • Satiety test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Effects of carbonated water on functional dyspepsia and constipation. / Cuomo, Rosario; Grasso, Raffella; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Capuano, Gaetano; Nicolai, Emanuele; Nardone, Gerardo; Pomponi, Domenico; Budillon, Gabriele; Ierardi, Enzo.

In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 14, No. 9, 09.2002, p. 991-999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cuomo, R, Grasso, R, Sarnelli, G, Capuano, G, Nicolai, E, Nardone, G, Pomponi, D, Budillon, G & Ierardi, E 2002, 'Effects of carbonated water on functional dyspepsia and constipation' European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 14, no. 9, pp. 991-999. https://doi.org/10.1097/00042737-200209000-00010
Cuomo, Rosario ; Grasso, Raffella ; Sarnelli, Giovanni ; Capuano, Gaetano ; Nicolai, Emanuele ; Nardone, Gerardo ; Pomponi, Domenico ; Budillon, Gabriele ; Ierardi, Enzo. / Effects of carbonated water on functional dyspepsia and constipation. In: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2002 ; Vol. 14, No. 9. pp. 991-999.
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abstract = "Objective: The effects of carbonated beverages on the gastrointestinal tract have been poorly investigated. Therefore, this study aims to assess the effect of carbonated water intake in patients with functional dyspepsia and constipation. Methods: Twenty-one patients with dyspepsia and secondary constipation were randomized into two groups in a double-blind fashion. One group (10 subjects) drank carbonated water and the other (11 subjects) tap water for almost 15 days. Patients were evaluated for dyspepsia and constipation scores, and underwent a satiety test by a liquid meal, radionuclide gastric emptying, sonographic gallbladder emptying and colonic transit time, using radio-opaque markers. Results: The dyspepsia score was significantly reduced with carbonated water (before = 7.9 ± 2.8 vs after = 5.4 ± 1.7; P <0.05) and remained unmodified after tap water (9.7 ± 5.3 vs 9.9 ± 4.0). The constipation score also decreased significantly (P <0.05) after carbonated water (16.0 ± 3.9 vs 12.1 ± 4.4; P <0.05) and was not significantly different with tap water (14.7 ± 5.1 vs 13.7 ± 4.7). Satiety was significantly reduced with carbonated water (before = 447 ± 146 kcal vs after = 590 ± 245; P <0.01). Gallbladder emptying (delta percent contraction) was significantly improved only with carbonated water (39.9 ± 16.1{\%} vs 53.6 ± 16.7{\%}; P <0.01). Conclusion: In patients complaining of functional dyspepsia and constipation, carbonated water decreases satiety and improves dyspepsia, constipation and gallbladder emptying.",
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AU - Nardone, Gerardo

AU - Pomponi, Domenico

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