Effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with advanced heart failure

Giulio Molon, Edoardo Adamo, Gaetano M. De Ferrari, Francesco Accardi, Eros Dalla Vecchia, Luciano Sallusti, Stefano Ciaffoni, Enrico Barbieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although a more favorable neurohormonal balance may contribute to improving symptoms following cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), no information is available regarding the effects of CRT on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study assessed the effects of CRT on IGF-1 levels and their correlation with changes in quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with cardiomyopathy in New York Heart Association class III or IV (n = 18; age 71 ± 10 years), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40% and QRS ≥ 130 ms or ventricular dyssynchrony were enrolled in the study and followed up for 6 months. After 3 months, there was an improvement in LVEF (from 29 ± 7 to 33 ± 10%, P = 0.0136) and quality of life (from 33 ± 14 to 13 ± 12, P = 0.0000) and an increase in IGF-1 levels (from 137 ± 79 to 175 ± 111 ng/ml, P = 0.01353). The change in quality of life correlated with changes in IGF-1 levels (P = 0.02) but not with LVEF changes. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced heart failure, CRT leads to a significant increase in plasma IGF-1 levels within 3 months. This increase is correlated with the improvement in quality of life, whereas the increase in LVEF is not. This finding suggests that IGF-1 may play a role as a mediator in the early phase of symptomatic improvement after CRT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-922
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Medicine
Volume8
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

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Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy
Somatomedins
Heart Failure
Stroke Volume
Quality of Life
Cardiomyopathies
Left Ventricular Function

Keywords

  • Cardiac resynchronization therapy
  • CRT
  • Heart failure
  • IGF-1
  • Neurohormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with advanced heart failure. / Molon, Giulio; Adamo, Edoardo; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Accardi, Francesco; Vecchia, Eros Dalla; Sallusti, Luciano; Ciaffoni, Stefano; Barbieri, Enrico.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 917-922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molon, Giulio ; Adamo, Edoardo ; De Ferrari, Gaetano M. ; Accardi, Francesco ; Vecchia, Eros Dalla ; Sallusti, Luciano ; Ciaffoni, Stefano ; Barbieri, Enrico. / Effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on insulin-like growth factor-1 in patients with advanced heart failure. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 11. pp. 917-922.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Although a more favorable neurohormonal balance may contribute to improving symptoms following cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), no information is available regarding the effects of CRT on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study assessed the effects of CRT on IGF-1 levels and their correlation with changes in quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with cardiomyopathy in New York Heart Association class III or IV (n = 18; age 71 ± 10 years), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40{\%} and QRS ≥ 130 ms or ventricular dyssynchrony were enrolled in the study and followed up for 6 months. After 3 months, there was an improvement in LVEF (from 29 ± 7 to 33 ± 10{\%}, P = 0.0136) and quality of life (from 33 ± 14 to 13 ± 12, P = 0.0000) and an increase in IGF-1 levels (from 137 ± 79 to 175 ± 111 ng/ml, P = 0.01353). The change in quality of life correlated with changes in IGF-1 levels (P = 0.02) but not with LVEF changes. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced heart failure, CRT leads to a significant increase in plasma IGF-1 levels within 3 months. This increase is correlated with the improvement in quality of life, whereas the increase in LVEF is not. This finding suggests that IGF-1 may play a role as a mediator in the early phase of symptomatic improvement after CRT.",
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AU - De Ferrari, Gaetano M.

AU - Accardi, Francesco

AU - Vecchia, Eros Dalla

AU - Sallusti, Luciano

AU - Ciaffoni, Stefano

AU - Barbieri, Enrico

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Although a more favorable neurohormonal balance may contribute to improving symptoms following cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), no information is available regarding the effects of CRT on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study assessed the effects of CRT on IGF-1 levels and their correlation with changes in quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with cardiomyopathy in New York Heart Association class III or IV (n = 18; age 71 ± 10 years), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40% and QRS ≥ 130 ms or ventricular dyssynchrony were enrolled in the study and followed up for 6 months. After 3 months, there was an improvement in LVEF (from 29 ± 7 to 33 ± 10%, P = 0.0136) and quality of life (from 33 ± 14 to 13 ± 12, P = 0.0000) and an increase in IGF-1 levels (from 137 ± 79 to 175 ± 111 ng/ml, P = 0.01353). The change in quality of life correlated with changes in IGF-1 levels (P = 0.02) but not with LVEF changes. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced heart failure, CRT leads to a significant increase in plasma IGF-1 levels within 3 months. This increase is correlated with the improvement in quality of life, whereas the increase in LVEF is not. This finding suggests that IGF-1 may play a role as a mediator in the early phase of symptomatic improvement after CRT.

AB - BACKGROUND: Although a more favorable neurohormonal balance may contribute to improving symptoms following cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), no information is available regarding the effects of CRT on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study assessed the effects of CRT on IGF-1 levels and their correlation with changes in quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with cardiomyopathy in New York Heart Association class III or IV (n = 18; age 71 ± 10 years), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40% and QRS ≥ 130 ms or ventricular dyssynchrony were enrolled in the study and followed up for 6 months. After 3 months, there was an improvement in LVEF (from 29 ± 7 to 33 ± 10%, P = 0.0136) and quality of life (from 33 ± 14 to 13 ± 12, P = 0.0000) and an increase in IGF-1 levels (from 137 ± 79 to 175 ± 111 ng/ml, P = 0.01353). The change in quality of life correlated with changes in IGF-1 levels (P = 0.02) but not with LVEF changes. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced heart failure, CRT leads to a significant increase in plasma IGF-1 levels within 3 months. This increase is correlated with the improvement in quality of life, whereas the increase in LVEF is not. This finding suggests that IGF-1 may play a role as a mediator in the early phase of symptomatic improvement after CRT.

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