Effects of chronic clonidine administration on sympathetic nerve traffic and baroreflex function in heart failure

Guido Grassi, Carlo Turri, Gino Seravalle, Giovanni Bertinieri, Alberto Pierini, Giuseppe Mancia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Congestive heart failure is characterized by a sympathetic activation that is coupled with a baroreflex impairment. Whether these alterations are affected by clonidine is unknown. In 26 normotensive patients age 58.0±1.1 years (mean±SEM) affected by congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class II or III) and treated with furosemide and enalapril, we measured mean arterial pressure, heart rate, venous plasma norepinephrine, and muscle sympathetic nerve traffic (microneurography) at rest and during baroreceptor stimulation and deactivation caused by stepwise intravenous infusions of phenylephrine and nitroprusside, respectively. Measurements were repeated after a 2-month administration of transdermal clonidine patch (14 patients) or placebo (12 patients) according to a double-blind, randomized sequence. Clonidine caused a slight, nonsignificant reduction in mean arterial pressure and heart rate without affecting exercise capacity and echocardiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. In contrast, both plasma norepinephrine and sympathetic nerve traffic were significantly reduced (-46.8% and -26.7%, respectively; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-291
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume38
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Baroreceptors
  • Clonidine
  • Heart failure
  • Nervous system, autonomic
  • Nervous system, sympathetic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of chronic clonidine administration on sympathetic nerve traffic and baroreflex function in heart failure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this