Effects of Composition of Alginate-Polyethylene Glycol Microcapsules and Transplant Site on Encapsulated Islet Graft Outcomes in Mice

Chiara Villa, Vita Manzoli, Maria M. Abreu, Connor A. Verheyen, Michael Seskin, Mejdi Najjar, Damaris D. Molano, Yvan Torrente, Camillo Ricordi, Alice A. Tomei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding the effects of capsule composition and transplantation site on graft outcomes of encapsulated islets will aid in the development of more effective strategies for islet transplantation without immunosuppression. METHODS: Here we evaluated the effects of transplanting alginate (ALG)-based microcapsules (Micro) in the confined and well-vascularized epididymal fat pad (EFP) site, a model of the human omentum, as opposed to free-floating in the intraperitoneal cavity (IP) in mice. We also examined the effects of reinforcing ALG with polyethylene glycol (PEG). To allow transplantation in the EFP site, we minimized capsule size to 500±17μm. Unlike ALG, PEG resists osmotic stress, hence we generated hybrid microcapsules by mixing PEG and ALG (MicroMix) or by coating ALG capsules with a 15±2μm PEG layer (Double). RESULTS: We found improved engraftment of fully allogeneic BALB/c islets in Micro capsules transplanted in the EFP (median reversal time MRT: 1d) vs. the IP site (MRT: 5d, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1025-1035
JournalTransplantation
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Transplantation

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