Effects of estrogens on extracellular matrix synthesis in cultures of human normal and scleroderma skin fibroblasts: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

Stefano Soldano, Paola Montagna, Renata Brizzolara, Alberto Sulli, Aurora Parodi, Bruno Seriolo, Sabrina Paolino, Barbara Villaggio, Maurizio Cutolo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To investigate the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein synthesis (collagen type I, fibronectin, and laminin) using cultures of normal and scleroderma (SSc) skin fibroblasts. Primary fibroblasts cultures, obtained from skin biopsies of six female voluntary subjects and three female SSc patients, were treated for 24 h with E2 (10-10M) alone or in combination with tamoxifene (TAM, 10-7M) as an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist. ECM protein synthesis was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. E2 induced a significant increase of fibronectin, collagen type I, and laminin synthesis both in normal (P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.01, respectively) and SSc fibroblasts (P <0.001, P <0.05, P <0.001, respectively) when compared to untreated fibroblasts. TAM induced a significant decrease of ECM protein synthesis when compared to E2-treated TAM-untreated fibroblasts. This study seems to support important modulatory effects of E2 in the fibrotic progression of the SSc process via ER interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages25-29
Number of pages5
Volume1193
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1193
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Keywords

  • 17beta-estradiol
  • Collagen type 1
  • Fibroblast
  • Systemic sclerosis
  • Tamoxifene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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