Effects of exogenous progesterone on fetal nuchal translucency: an observational prospective study

Claudio Giorlandino, Pietro Cignini, Francesco Padula, Diana Giannarelli, Laura d'Emidio, Alessia Aloisi, Francesco Plotti, Roberto Angioli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Nuchal translucency (NT) seen ultrasonographically at 11-14 weeks' gestation is a sensitive marker for Down syndrome. Despite its important role for Down syndrome screening, its use is still considered controversial due to high false-positive rates. We speculated that progesterone could lead to abnormal blood flow patterns and, subsequently, to increased NT. Our primary endpoint was to evaluate the effects of exogenous progesterone on NT thickness compared to controls. The secondary endpoint was to evaluate these effects in a subgroup at low risk for fetal aneuploidies, identifying the strongest factors influencing NT variation. The tertiary endpoint was to evaluate, within the treatment group, if there is any difference in NT according to the type of progesterone administered, route of administration, and dose regimen.

STUDY DESIGN: All women who came to measure NT at 11-14 weeks' gestation (crown-rump length between 45-84 mm) were considered eligible. We divided patients into 2 groups: women receiving exogenous progesterone and controls. Afterwards, 3 NT scans were performed for each case, and the largest value, accurate to 2 decimal points, was recorded.

RESULTS: In all, 3716 women were enrolled and analyzed. In a crude analysis, NT (P <.05) increased in the exogenous progesterone group. The same results were obtained in the low-risk group (P <.05). The factorial analysis of variance model confirmed a correlation between altered NT and gestational age (P <.0001) and progesterone exposure (P <.05). The characteristics of treatment (route, formulation, dose) were examined separately and no statistically significant differences among the subgroups were observed.

CONCLUSION: Exogenous progesterone increases NT.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume212
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2015

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Nuchal Translucency Measurement
Observational Studies
Progesterone
Prospective Studies
Down Syndrome
Crown-Rump Length
Pregnancy
Aneuploidy
Gestational Age
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • aneuploidy
  • embryo development
  • nuchal translucency
  • progesterone
  • ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of exogenous progesterone on fetal nuchal translucency : an observational prospective study. / Giorlandino, Claudio; Cignini, Pietro; Padula, Francesco; Giannarelli, Diana; d'Emidio, Laura; Aloisi, Alessia; Plotti, Francesco; Angioli, Roberto.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 212, No. 3, 01.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giorlandino, Claudio ; Cignini, Pietro ; Padula, Francesco ; Giannarelli, Diana ; d'Emidio, Laura ; Aloisi, Alessia ; Plotti, Francesco ; Angioli, Roberto. / Effects of exogenous progesterone on fetal nuchal translucency : an observational prospective study. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015 ; Vol. 212, No. 3.
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AU - Plotti, Francesco

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