Effects of fluid flow and calcium phosphate coating on human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a defined 2D model system

S. Scaglione, D. Wendt, S. Miggino, A. Papadimitropoulos, M. Fato, R. Quarto, I. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effect of the long-term (10 days) application of a defined and uniform level of fluid flow (uniform shear stress of 1.2 × 10 -3 N/m 2) on human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) cultured on different substrates (i.e., uncoated glass or calcium phosphate coated glass, Osteologic™) in a 2D parallel plate model. Both exposure to flow and culture on Osteologic significantly reduced the number of cell doublings. BMSC cultured under flow were more intensely stained for collagen type I and by von Kossa for mineralized matrix. BMSC exposed to flow displayed an increased osteogenic commitment (i.e., higher mRNA expression of cbfa-1 and osterix), although phenotype changes in response to flow (i.e., mRNA expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein) were dependent on the substrate used. These findings highlight the importance of the combination of physical forces and culture substrate to determine the functional state of differentiating osteoblastic cells. The results obtained using a simple and controlled 2D model system may help to interpret the long-term effects of BMSC culture under perfusion within 3D porous scaffolds, where multiple experimental variables cannot be easily studied independently, and shear stresses cannot be precisely computed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-419
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Phosphate coatings
Calcium phosphate
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Flow of fluids
Bone
Coatings
Glass
Shear stress
Substrates
Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein
Messenger RNA
Osteopontin
Osteocalcin
Scaffolds (biology)
Collagen Type I
Cell culture
Collagen
Cell Culture Techniques
Perfusion
Cell Count

Keywords

  • Bioreactor
  • Ceramic
  • Differentiation
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Physical forces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

Effects of fluid flow and calcium phosphate coating on human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a defined 2D model system. / Scaglione, S.; Wendt, D.; Miggino, S.; Papadimitropoulos, A.; Fato, M.; Quarto, R.; Martin, I.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A, Vol. 86, No. 2, 08.2008, p. 411-419.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scaglione, S. ; Wendt, D. ; Miggino, S. ; Papadimitropoulos, A. ; Fato, M. ; Quarto, R. ; Martin, I. / Effects of fluid flow and calcium phosphate coating on human bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a defined 2D model system. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part A. 2008 ; Vol. 86, No. 2. pp. 411-419.
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