Effects of low exposure to inorganic mercury on psychological performance

L. Soleo, M. L. Urbano, V. Petrera, L. Ambrosi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of low exposure to inorganic mercury on psychological performance was investigated: the study groups included eight chronically exposed workers and 20 who were only occasionally exposed. These were compared with a control group of 22 subjects from the same plant who were not exposed to mercury. All subjects were administered the WHO test battery to detect preclinical signs of central nervous system impairment: the battery includes the Santa Ana (Helsinki version) test, simple reaction time, the Benton test, and the Wechsler digit span and digit symbol. In addition, the Gordon test was used to study personality profiles and the clinical depression questionnaire. Urinary mercury was used as indicator for internal dose. To this effect, urinary mercury observed in workers examined from 1979 to 1987 was evaluated. Of the psychic functions explored by behavioural tests, only short term auditory memory was found to be impaired in the chronically exposed workers (p <0.05 compared with the controls). The chronically exposed workers were also found to be more depressed than those in the two other groups. No changes of visual motor functions were observed. The personality of the occupationally exposed workers was found to be considerably changed compared with that of the control group. On the basis of the results obtained and in view of urinary mercury mean concentrations in the exposed groups which were 30-40 μg/l over the years, it is suggested that the TLV-TWA for mercury should be lowered to 0.025 mg/m3 and that the biological urinary exposure indicator for biological monitoring should be 25 μg/l.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-109
Number of pages5
JournalBritish Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume47
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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Mercury
Psychology
Personality
Threshold Limit Values
Control Groups
Environmental Monitoring
Short-Term Memory
Reaction Time
Central Nervous System
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of low exposure to inorganic mercury on psychological performance. / Soleo, L.; Urbano, M. L.; Petrera, V.; Ambrosi, L.

In: British Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 2, 1990, p. 105-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Soleo, L. ; Urbano, M. L. ; Petrera, V. ; Ambrosi, L. / Effects of low exposure to inorganic mercury on psychological performance. In: British Journal of Industrial Medicine. 1990 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 105-109.
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