Effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery on pulmonary function in young subjects with spinal muscular atrophy type 2 and other neuromuscular scoliosis

Luca Colombo, Carlotta Martini, Chiara Bersanini, Francesca Izzo, Jorge H Villafañe, Pedro Berjano, Claudio Lamartina

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery (MCGRS) of the scoliosis on pulmonary function in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.

METHODS: Seven patients, 85.7% female (mean ± SD age: 6.7±1.2 years), with neuromuscular scoliosis (4 SMA II, 2 congenital myopathies and 1 VACTER syndrome), received MCGRS of the spine in the thoraco-lumbar area. The outcome measures were clinical features and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1st second [FEV1], were collected. All measures were collected at pre-, post-intervention and follow-up (short-term [0-6 months], mid-term [7-12 months], and long-term [13-24 months]).

RESULTS: MCGRS reduced Cobb angle after intervention in 100% in subjects and this result was maintained at 24-month follow-up (all, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in FVC or FEV1 between preoperative and each postoperative period, (P>0.05). Analyses of the correlation coefficients indicated no significant associations between changes in pulmonary function and scoliosis.

CONCLUSIONS: The current study found that MCGRS addressed to the scoliosis maintained pulmonary function during long-term follow-up; However, pulmonary function was not associated with scoiosis in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Sciences
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - May 31 2017

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Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood
Scoliosis
Lung
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Myotonia Congenita
Postoperative Period
Spine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

@article{21b277b396e549ea986626e37624a773,
title = "Effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery on pulmonary function in young subjects with spinal muscular atrophy type 2 and other neuromuscular scoliosis",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery (MCGRS) of the scoliosis on pulmonary function in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.METHODS: Seven patients, 85.7{\%} female (mean ± SD age: 6.7±1.2 years), with neuromuscular scoliosis (4 SMA II, 2 congenital myopathies and 1 VACTER syndrome), received MCGRS of the spine in the thoraco-lumbar area. The outcome measures were clinical features and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1st second [FEV1], were collected. All measures were collected at pre-, post-intervention and follow-up (short-term [0-6 months], mid-term [7-12 months], and long-term [13-24 months]).RESULTS: MCGRS reduced Cobb angle after intervention in 100{\%} in subjects and this result was maintained at 24-month follow-up (all, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in FVC or FEV1 between preoperative and each postoperative period, (P>0.05). Analyses of the correlation coefficients indicated no significant associations between changes in pulmonary function and scoliosis.CONCLUSIONS: The current study found that MCGRS addressed to the scoliosis maintained pulmonary function during long-term follow-up; However, pulmonary function was not associated with scoiosis in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Luca Colombo and Carlotta Martini and Chiara Bersanini and Francesca Izzo and Villafa{\~n}e, {Jorge H} and Pedro Berjano and Claudio Lamartina",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "31",
doi = "10.23736/S0390-5616.17.04052-8",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences",
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T1 - Effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery on pulmonary function in young subjects with spinal muscular atrophy type 2 and other neuromuscular scoliosis

AU - Colombo, Luca

AU - Martini, Carlotta

AU - Bersanini, Chiara

AU - Izzo, Francesca

AU - Villafañe, Jorge H

AU - Berjano, Pedro

AU - Lamartina, Claudio

PY - 2017/5/31

Y1 - 2017/5/31

N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery (MCGRS) of the scoliosis on pulmonary function in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.METHODS: Seven patients, 85.7% female (mean ± SD age: 6.7±1.2 years), with neuromuscular scoliosis (4 SMA II, 2 congenital myopathies and 1 VACTER syndrome), received MCGRS of the spine in the thoraco-lumbar area. The outcome measures were clinical features and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1st second [FEV1], were collected. All measures were collected at pre-, post-intervention and follow-up (short-term [0-6 months], mid-term [7-12 months], and long-term [13-24 months]).RESULTS: MCGRS reduced Cobb angle after intervention in 100% in subjects and this result was maintained at 24-month follow-up (all, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in FVC or FEV1 between preoperative and each postoperative period, (P>0.05). Analyses of the correlation coefficients indicated no significant associations between changes in pulmonary function and scoliosis.CONCLUSIONS: The current study found that MCGRS addressed to the scoliosis maintained pulmonary function during long-term follow-up; However, pulmonary function was not associated with scoiosis in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.

AB - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of magnetically controlled growing rods surgery (MCGRS) of the scoliosis on pulmonary function in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.METHODS: Seven patients, 85.7% female (mean ± SD age: 6.7±1.2 years), with neuromuscular scoliosis (4 SMA II, 2 congenital myopathies and 1 VACTER syndrome), received MCGRS of the spine in the thoraco-lumbar area. The outcome measures were clinical features and pulmonary function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1st second [FEV1], were collected. All measures were collected at pre-, post-intervention and follow-up (short-term [0-6 months], mid-term [7-12 months], and long-term [13-24 months]).RESULTS: MCGRS reduced Cobb angle after intervention in 100% in subjects and this result was maintained at 24-month follow-up (all, P=0.001). There was no significant difference in FVC or FEV1 between preoperative and each postoperative period, (P>0.05). Analyses of the correlation coefficients indicated no significant associations between changes in pulmonary function and scoliosis.CONCLUSIONS: The current study found that MCGRS addressed to the scoliosis maintained pulmonary function during long-term follow-up; However, pulmonary function was not associated with scoiosis in children with neuromuscular scoliosis.

KW - Journal Article

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