Effects of naloxone on prolactin, luteinizing hormone and cortisol responses to surgical stress in humans

A. E. Pontiroli, G. Baio, L. Stella, A. Crescenti, A. M. Girardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To evaluate the possible involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the responses of PRL, LH, and cortisol to surgical stress, we have studied the effect of naloxone on these hormones in otherwise normal subjects of both sexes undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones. In 24 subjects (12 males and 12 females), premedication consisted of atropine sulfate (0.007 mg/kg BW); general anesthesia (30 min later) was induced by thiopental (7 mg/kg) and maintained constant by 1% ethrane in a 70%:30% nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture. In 6 males and 6 females, naloxone (0.4 mg) was injected iv before anesthesia induction. After skin incision, a clear PRL release was observed in all subjects, this was more evident in females than in males. PRL release was significantly lower in naloxone-pretreated subjects. LH release was observed only in males and was significantly higher in naloxone-pretreated subjects. Cortisol release occurred in both sexes in a similar way and was not significantly different in naloxone-pretreated subjects. These results indicate that endogenous opioid peptides are involved in stress-induced PRL and LH release in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378-380
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume55
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1982

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Naloxone
Luteinizing Hormone
Prolactin
Hydrocortisone
Opioid Peptides
Enflurane
Thiopental
Premedication
Nitrous Oxide
Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Atropine
General Anesthesia
Skin
Anesthesia
Hormones
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Effects of naloxone on prolactin, luteinizing hormone and cortisol responses to surgical stress in humans. / Pontiroli, A. E.; Baio, G.; Stella, L.; Crescenti, A.; Girardi, A. M.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 55, No. 2, 1982, p. 378-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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