Effects of neuropeptide Y on coronary artery vasomotion in patients with microvascular angina

Giuseppe M.C. Rosano, Dimitris Tousoulis, Eugene McFadden, John Clarke, Graham J. Davies, Juan Carlos Kaski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Patients with microvascular angina (exertional angina, positive exercise tests and normal coronary arteriograms) usually have a reduced coronary blood flow reserve. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent endogenous vasoconstrictor involved in modulation of coronary vasomotor tone and may play a role in microvascular angina. Methods We compared the effects of NPY (0.2–1.0 pmol/kg, intracoronary) on the vasomotor response of proximal and distal segments of the coronary arteries in 7 patients with microvascular angina, 9 with chronic stable angina, and 9 control individuals. The coronary response to the administration of ergonovine was also assessed in 9 other patients with microvascular angina. Computerized coronary artery diameter measurements were carried out before (baseline) and after the administration of the vasoactive agents. Results Mean baseline coronary lumen diameters were similar in control, microvascular angina, and coronary artery disease patients. NPY constricted proximal coronary segments by 8 ± 2%, 5 ± 2% and 6 ± 3% and distal segments by 14 ± 2%, 11 ± 2% and 10 ± 2% in control, microvascular angina, and coronary artery disease patients, respectively (p = NS between groups). In patients with microvascular angina, ergonovine constricted proximal coronary segments by 7 ± 1.5% and distal segments by 12.5 ± 3% (p = NS vs. NPY). During NPY administration four microvascular angina patients developed chest pain, ST segment depression, and a marked lengthening of the contrast medium run off, in the absence of epicardial coronary artery spasm. Control individuals and coronary artery disease patients did not experience chest pain, ST segment shifts, or lengthening of the run off during NPY administration. Ergonovine administration caused chest pain and lengthening of the contrast run-off, in the absence of epicardial coronary artery spasm, in one microvascular angina patient. Conclusions Exogenous NPY causes mild epicardial coronary artery constriction which is similar in patients with non-cardiac chest pain, microvascular angina and coronary artery disease. Myocardial ischemia and marked lengthening of the contrast run off in response to NPY occurred in microvascular angina patients but not in control or coronary artery disease patients. An abnormal constrictor response to NPY at the microcirculation level could be the mechanism underlying the ischemic manifestations observed in patients with microvascular angina. Condensed abstract (table of contents) The vasomotor response of proximal and distal coronary artery segments was studied in twenty five patients: 7 microvascular angina, 9 chronic stable angina, and 9 control subjects. Computerized measurements of coronary diameters were carried out before and after the intracoronary administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and ergonovine. Constriction of epicardial arteries in response to NPY was mild and not significantly different in control, microvascular angina and coronary artery disease patients. Ergonovine-induced epicardial coronary artery constriction was similar to that of NPY. However, NPY caused transient myocardial ischemia in patients with microvascular angina (probably through constriction of the small intramyocardial vessels), but not in control subjects or coronary artery disease patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-127
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume238
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • Coronary reactivity
  • Left ventricular dysfunction
  • Microvascular angina
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • Syndrome X

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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