Effects of nutrition on disease and life span. II. Vascular disease, serum cholesterol, serum thromboxane, and heart-produced prostacyclin in MRL mice

D. A. Mark, D. R. Alonso, R. Tack-Goldman, H. T. Thaler, E. Tremoli, B. B. Weksler, M. E. Weksler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Mice of the autoimmune strain MRL/l, the congenic strain MRL/n, and two control strains, Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice, were fed diets which varied in the content of lipid and cholesterol. Serum cholesterol levels were highest in mice fed diets containing cholesterol and lowest in mice fed laboratory 'chow'. Animals fed diets that increased serum cholesterol had decreased production of prostacyclin by vascular tissue and increased production of thromboxane A2 by platelets. Prostacyclin production of heart tissue in response to arachidonic acid showed a negative correlation (r = -0.86) with serum cholesterol. In contrast, serum thromboxane demonstrated a positive correlation (r = 0.70) with serum cholesterol. The prevalence of autoimmune vasculitis seen in MRL/lpr mice was not affected by diet. However, MRL/lpr mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-containing diet had intimal vascular lesions, containing foam cells typical of arteriosclerosis. It is suggested that diets that raise serum cholesterol may influence the nature of autoimmune-mediated vascular disease by altering the balance between thromboxane and prostacyclin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-130
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume117
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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