Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: Results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study

Raffaele Garofalo, Marco Conti, Angela Notarnicola, Leonardo Maradei, Antonio Giardella, Alessandro Castagna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study included 100 patients who underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. All patients suffered about a rotator cuff tear that was repaired arthroscopically with a suture anchor technique. Immediately postoperatively, patients were randomly allocated to one of two different postoperative physiotherapy regimens: passive self-assisted range of motion exercise (controls: 46 patients) versus passive self-assisted range of motion exercise associated with use of continuous passive motion (CPM) for a total of 2 h per day (experimental group: 54 patients), for 4 weeks. After this time, all the patients of both groups underwent the same physical therapy protocol. An independent examiner assessed the patients at 2.5, 6 and 12 months particularly about pain with the VAS scale (0-10) and the range of motion (ROM). Our findings show that postoperative treatment of an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with passive self-assisted exercises associated with 2-h CPM a day provides a significant advantage in terms of ROM improvement and pain relief when compared to passive self-assisted exercise alone, at the short-term follow-up. No significant differences between the two groups were observed at 1 year postoperatively.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMusculoskeletal Surgery
Volume94
Issue numberSUPP
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Rotator Cuff
Prospective Studies
Articular Range of Motion
Exercise
Suture Anchors
Suture Techniques
Pain
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Continuous passive motion
  • Rehabilitation
  • Rotator cuff
  • Shoulder
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair : Results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study. / Garofalo, Raffaele; Conti, Marco; Notarnicola, Angela; Maradei, Leonardo; Giardella, Antonio; Castagna, Alessandro.

In: Musculoskeletal Surgery, Vol. 94, No. SUPP, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garofalo, Raffaele ; Conti, Marco ; Notarnicola, Angela ; Maradei, Leonardo ; Giardella, Antonio ; Castagna, Alessandro. / Effects of one-month continuous passive motion after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair : Results at 1-year follow-up of a prospective randomized study. In: Musculoskeletal Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 94, No. SUPP.
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